Lambs quarter


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Related to Lambs quarter: purslane

Lambs quarter

A wild plant sometimes used in salads.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some of the tangible benefits may be quite specific, such as the product kills lambs quarter weeds or protects against intestinal parasites
Lambs quarter is one of the most common weeds in gardens, backyards and fallow fields, following human habitation closely.
Chenopodium album, the scientific name of lambs quarter, translates to "white goose foot" and refers to both the white mealy covering and the leaves' resemblance to the webbed foot of a goose.
(The name pigweed is also used for wild amaranth, another common edible garden weed.) There are several explanations for the origins of lambs quarter's name.
I like to make a tofu quiche every spring from the tender tops of nettle, wild amaranth and lambs quarter. Rich in Vitamins A, C, [B.sub.1] and [B.sub.2], iron and protein, this nutrient-dense green is worth letting be in the garden where it is not out-competing planted vegetables.
Lambs quarter requires no cultivation and is relatively disease- and insect-free.
Has: loveties, yellow marigold, damis rockets, orange tomato, parsley, Indian corn, woodsorrel, lambs quarter, yarrow, chapalote popcorn, ornamental corn, ornamental peppers, wild soapstone yucca, horehound, coriander, French thyme, fenugreek, cosmos, zinnia
Many upscale supermarkets and restaurants now offer wild greens like fiddleheads, watercress and lambs quarters.
Try these wild edibles available in Spring time: Wild Amaranth or Pigweed, Lambs quarters, Ladys thumb, Daylily flowers, Peppergrass, Sheep sorrel, Wood sorrel, Juneberry fruits Galinsoga leaves, Sochan (Rudbeckia laciniata) leaves, Catbriar shoots, Kudzu Shoots, Elderberry flowers.