tortoise

(redirected from Land turtle)
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tor·toise

 (tôr′tĭs)
n.
1. Any of various terrestrial turtles, especially one of the family Testudinidae, characteristically having thick clublike hind limbs and a high, rounded carapace.
2. One that moves slowly; a laggard.

[Middle English tortuce, turtle, tortoise, probably partly from Anglo-Norman tortouse (variant of Old French tortue) and partly from Medieval Latin tortūca, both ultimately from Vulgar Latin *tartarūca, feminine of *tartarūcus, of Tartarus; see turtle1.]

tortoise

(ˈtɔːtəs)
n
1. (Animals) any herbivorous terrestrial chelonian reptile of the family Testudinidae, of most warm regions, having a heavy dome-shaped shell and clawed limbs.
2. (Animals) water tortoise another name for terrapin
3. a slow-moving person
4. (Arms & Armour (excluding Firearms)) another word for testudo See also giant tortoise
[C15: probably from Old French tortue (influenced by Latin tortus twisted), from Medieval Latin tortūca, from Late Latin tartarūcha coming from Tartarus, from Greek tartaroukhos; referring to the belief that the tortoise originated in the underworld]

tor•toise

(ˈtɔr təs)

n.
1. a turtle, esp. a terrestrial turtle.
2. a very slow person or thing.
[1350–1400; variant of earlier tortuse, tortose, tortuce, Middle English tortuca < Medieval Latin tortūca, for Late Latin tartarūcha (feminine adj.) of Tartarus (< Greek tartaroûcha), the tortoise being regarded as an infernal animal]

tor·toise

(tôr′tĭs)
Any of various turtles that live on land.

tortoise

  • shellpad - Another name for a tortoise.
  • testudinate - Means "slow-moving; like a turtle," from Latin testudo, "tortoise," and also describes something curved or vaulted like a turtle shell.
  • Galapagos Islands - Named for the massive tortoises living there, from Old Spanish galapago, "tortoise."
  • turtle, tortoise, terrapin - Turtle is applied to those living in water and tortoise to those that live on land, while terrapins live in fresh water; turtle and tortoise may come from the Latin root tort, with reference to the animals' twisted feet.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tortoise - usually herbivorous land turtles having clawed elephant-like limbstortoise - usually herbivorous land turtles having clawed elephant-like limbs; worldwide in arid area except Australia and Antarctica
turtle - any of various aquatic and land reptiles having a bony shell and flipper-like limbs for swimming
European tortoise, Testudo graeca - small land tortoise of southern Europe
giant tortoise - very large tortoises of the Galapagos and Seychelles islands
gopher tortoise, gopher turtle, Gopherus polypemus, gopher - burrowing edible land tortoise of southeastern North America
desert tortoise, Gopherus agassizii - burrowing tortoise of the arid western United States and northern Mexico; may be reclassified as a member of genus Xerobates
Texas tortoise - close relative to the desert tortoise; may be reclassified as a member of genus Xerobates

tortoise

noun
Related words
adjectives chelonian, testudinal
see reptiles
Translations
سُلَحْفَاةسُلْحَفاه
želva
skildpadde
testudo
kilpikonna
kornjača
szárazföldi teknõsbékateknősteknősbéka
kura-kura
skjaldbaka
カメ
거북이
vėžlys
bruņurupucis
korytnačka
želva
sköldpadda
เต่า
kaplumbağakara kamlumbağasıtosbağa
con rùa

tortoise

[ˈtɔːtəs] Ntortuga f

tortoise

[ˈtɔːrtəs] ntortue f

tortoise

nSchildkröte f

tortoise

[ˈtɔːtəs] ntartaruga

tortoise

(ˈtoːtəs) noun
a kind of four-footed, slow-moving reptile covered with a hard shell.

tortoise

سُلَحْفَاة želva skildpadde Schildkröte χελώνα tortuga kilpikonna tortue kornjača tartaruga カメ 거북이 schildpad skilpadde żółw tartaruga черепаха sköldpadda เต่า kaplumbağa con rùa
References in periodicals archive ?
The first image in John Beatty's collection, gleaned from decades spent photographing the natural world, shows a giant Galapagos land turtle, the focus so tight that its shell is obscured, and only the head visible.
Railsback notes the famous climactic opening, the use of the land turtle and the evolution of Tom, but has little to say about Steinbeck's application of the 'phalanx' concept to human groups or to the articulation of shifting collectivities through biological metaphors.
A tortoise, or land turtle, might cover about 15 feet (4.5 m) in a minute.