Lanfranc


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Lan·franc

 (lăn′frăngk′) 1005?-1089.
Italian-born English prelate and political adviser who was archbishop of Canterbury (1070-1089) and a counselor of William the Conqueror.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Lanfranc

(ˈlænfræŋk)
n
(Biography) ?1005–89, Italian ecclesiastic and scholar; archbishop of Canterbury (1070–89) and adviser to William the Conqueror. He instituted many reforms in the English Church
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
However, this same account records how the bones of the founding queen were removed by Archbishop Lanfranc to a new church he had founded in Canterbury, so there is no expectation of finding the original burial.
Born in London and raised in Ghana, Fuse returned to London for his secondary education, where he attended the Archbishop Lanfranc School, Croydon.
Continental clerics, then, according to this view, were seminal to the diffusion of cultural influences, particularly in England where, it is still commonly held, the first stirrings of what would become the twelfth-century Renaissance were brought by highly educated scholars like Archbishop Lanfranc in the wake of the Norman Conquest.
BY CAR | Bentham Drive, L16: Two-way temporary signals near Lanfranc Way until October 29.
(1) and y beleue 3if that he wyl take hede to alle [...] (MEMT, Lanfranc, Chirurgia magna 2).
In the eleventh century, Berengar of Tours advocated for Ratramnus's perspective and criticized Lanfranc of Bee for adhering to the position of Paschasius Radbertus.
The first volume examines Anselm's career at Bec, his relationship with Lanfranc, and his transforming the intellectual life of the school at Bec by his development of the dialectical method.
Even to this day every English bishop undertakes an act of fealty and an oath of allegiance to the Queen of England using a form that goes back to that given by Lanfranc to William I and by Anselm to Henry I.
Surely, Lanfranc of Milan's (c.1250-1306) Chirurgia magna (1296, here used in a translation published 1565) is not the work of a quack, however outdated it may have been by the late sixteenth century.
Osbern, one of the first native-born Englishmen to write a text after the Norman Conquest, has been identified as "a trouble-maker" with a "rebellious attitude toward the Norman hierarchy:' He spent a time of penitence at Bec and thought of Lanfranc as a present-day saint, but made few specific comments about Saxon and Norman difference.