Langobard


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Lan·go·bard

 (lăng′gə-bärd′)
n.

[Latin Langobardus; see Lombard.]

Lan′go·bar′dic adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Langobard

(ˈlæŋɡəˌbɑːd)
n
1. (Peoples) a less common name for a Lombard1
2. (Peoples) a less common name for a Lombard1
[C18: from Late Latin Langobardicus Lombard]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Lom•bard

(ˈlɒm bɑrd, -bərd, ˈlʌm-)

n.
1. a native or inhabitant of Lombardy.
2. a member of a Germanic people who occupied N Italy in a.d. 568.
3. a banker or moneylender.
adj.
4. Also, Lom•bar′di•an, Lom•bar′dic. of or pertaining to Lombardy or its inhabitants.

Lom•bard

(ˈlɒm bɑrd, -bərd, ˈlʌm-)

n.
Peter (Petrus Lombardus), c1100–64?, Italian theologian: bishop of Paris 1159–64?.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Langobard - a member of a Germanic people who invaded northern Italy in the 6th centuryLangobard - a member of a Germanic people who invaded northern Italy in the 6th century
European - a native or inhabitant of Europe
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gregory offers no Langobard origin-story, going back only to Alboin (198), the tenth Langobard king in Paul (1974, 49).
A proud Latin Roman who despised the barbaric Lombards (Langobards), a Scandinavian tribe which was pushed out of the Elbe (Labe) river region into norther Italy by the advancing Slavs, Gregory also refused to speak Greek and, disillusioned with Byzantine politics, he launched a new course for Western Europe which culminated in the subjugation of the Lombards by the Franks of Charlemagne.
"'Byzantium, New Rome!' Goths, Langobards, and Byzantium in The Lord of the Rings." In Tolkien and the Study of His Sources: Critical Essays.