Langobardic


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Lan·go·bard

 (lăng′gə-bärd′)
n.

[Latin Langobardus; see Lombard.]

Lan′go·bar′dic adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Langobardic

(ˌlæŋɡəˈbɑːdɪk)
n
1. (Historical Terms) the language of the ancient Lombards: a dialect of Old High German
2. (Languages) the language of the ancient Lombards: a dialect of Old High German
adj
3. (Historical Terms) of or relating to the Lombards or their language
4. (Languages) of or relating to the Lombards or their language
5. (Peoples) of or relating to the Lombards or their language
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Lan•go•bar•dic

(ˌlæŋ gəˈbɑr dɪk)

n.
1. the extinct West Germanic language of the Lombards.
adj.
2. of or pertaining to the Germanic Lombards or their speech.
[1715–25]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
She cites ten Gothic names, two Langobardic, and three in Byzantine Greek (all hobbits) in the legendarium.
But perhaps nowhere was there as continuous and widespread a tradition of arcosolium burials--from the Langobardic era through the Romanesque and beyond--as in Italy, embracing Lombardy, Liguria, and the Veneto in the north, Rome and its environs in the center, and Campania and especially Apulia in the south.