Language Style

Language Style


language typical of academies or the world of learning; pedantic language.
a tendency to longwindedness. — aeolistic, adj.
1. the writing or telling of short narratives concerning an interesting, amusing, or curious incident or event.
2. an excessive use of anecdotes, as sometimes in the conversation of the aged. — anecdotalist, n.
the deliberate use, for effect, of old-fashioned terminology in literature.
a manner of speech, writing, or architecture distinguished by excessive ornamentation or floridity. — Asiatical, adj.
the use of terms or constructions feit by some to be undesirably foreign to the established customs of the language. — barbarian, n., adj.
futile repetition in speech or writing.
language characteristic of government bureaucracy, characterized by excessive use of jargon, convoluted construction, and periphrasis.
language typical of that used by business people or the world of business, characterized by use of jargon and abbreviation.
a sharp, tart wittiness. Also causticness. — caustic, adj.
language typical of the cinema, as that used in film dialogue or in film criticism.
language typical of that used by college students, characterized by use of slang and neologisms.
language used by those in the business of manufacturing, selling, servicing, or using electronic computers, characterized by many abbreviations and acronyms, excessive use of technical jargon, and, frequently, lack of concern for traditional spelling and grammar.
1. any writing characterized by conceits, i.e., elaborate and fanciful figures of speech, as in the opening lines of T.S. Eliot’s “Prufrock.”
2. the use of conceits in writing.
language and jargon typical of economists and the field of economics.
1. the composition of brief witty, ingenious, or sententious statements.
2. the composition of short, concise poems, often satirical, displaying a witty or ingenious thought. — epigrammatist, n. — epigrammatic, adj.
language typical of the federal government, especially bureau-cratie jargon.
a high-flown, bombastic style of writing or speaking. — fustianist, n.
language typical of journalists and newspapers or magazines, characterized by use of neologism and unusual syntax. Also called newspaperese.
a tendency to use few words to express a great deal; conciseness. — laconic, adj.
language typical of lawyers, laws, legal forms, etc., characterized by archaic usage, prolixity, and extreme thoroughness.
Archaic. 1. the use of excessively learned and bombastic terminology.
2. an instance of this language style. — lexiphanic, adj.
1. the habitual use of literary forms.
2. an expression belonging to a literary language.
the quality, state, or art of clarity in thought and style. — lucidness, n. — lucid, adj.
a style of language in which Latin forms and words are mixed with vernacular words, as skato, slippere, falli, bumptum. — macaronic, n., adj.
an excessive wordiness.
journalese.
language characteristic of officialdom, typified by polysyllabism and much periphrasis.
the system of writing paragraphs in newspaper-journalism style. — paragraphist, n. — paragraphically, adv.
a tendency to boldness and frankness of speech; freedom of expression, as in much modern literature.
the language of pedagogues or language typical of pedagogues, characterized by pedanticism. Also called academese.
the use of a style lacking in vitality, imagination, or distinction; prosiness. — pedestrian, adj.
the quality, state, or art of writing or speaking in a fashion that is easy to understand. — pellucidness, n. — pellucid, adj.
language typical of the Pentagon or the U.S. defense establishment, characterized by use of acronyms, neologisms and the use of nouns as verbs and adjectives.
a written or spoken expression characteristic of the period following the classical period of a language. — postclassical, adj.
a style of speaking or writing characterized by bitter, contemptuous, or scornful derision.
yellow journalism.
language typical of high society, characterized by affectation.
language or jargon typical of sociology or sociologists.
language typical of the stage and stage people, characterized by affectation, hyperbole, and melodramatic effects.
the practice of expressing the successive ideas in a prose composition in single lines corresponding to natural cadences or sense divisions. — stichometric, stichometrical, adj.
the brief, sometimes cryptic language used in telegrams.
language typical of the entertainment journal Variety, characterized by a staccato, idiomatic, and neologistic style, with much use of abbreviation.
language typical of that used on Wall Street and in the financial markets, characterized by use of technical financial terms and arcane stock-market jargon.
federalese.
the practice of seeking out sensational news for the purpose of boosting a newspaper’s circulation, or, if such stories are hard to find, of trying to make comparatively innocuous news appear sensational. Also called sensationalism. — yellow journalist, n.
References in periodicals archive ?
The language style is targeted at 8+ but it's accessible by all ages as a useful resource for the classroom.
These new conceptualizations and techniques of enquiry have been described by Sadler and her colleagues in a language style and a vocabulary which may lie outside the comfort zone of some readers.
An Investigation of the Effects of Language Style and Communication Modality on Persuasion.
Furthermore, the Prize's aim is to maintain high level of Arabic language style and encourage people to recite poems and give attention to poetry as a vital part of Arab heritage and tradition.
The overhaul is a long-term effort that includes archiving out-of-date materials, adhering to plain language style, and refreshing content.
ii) at least three years of progressively responsible experience in at least one of the following fields: public relations, journalism, communications, with particular experience in complex and multi component programs in international organizations; (iii) ability to apply appropriate writing, speaking, and listening skills in order to precisely convey information, ideas, and opinions; (iv) demonstrated ability to produce high quality, creative communication materials using appropriate vocabulary and language style compatible with social conventions and sensitivities; (v) excellent knowledge and experience of use of modern audio-visual techniques and communications tools.
Specifically, much research has been dedicated to language situations of social power, such as the courtroom where the language style may vary according to the social power of speakers (e.
She uses her beautiful language style to continually encourage readers to question their own thoughts and values around asylum seekers and, more generally, migrants to Australia.
The documents--broadsides, bulletins, and circulars--that bookend the novel set the tone of the historical moment by showcasing the appearance and language style of Civil War-era journalism.
The service is designed to enable technology companies within a broad range of fields to ensure the optimal translation of complex documentation into crystal-clear English language style.
A mutal friend of Jiah and Suraj was quoted as saying: "The handwriting seems to be different and the language style also varies.
The language style is new and much more circumspect.

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