magic lantern

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magic lantern

n.
An optical device formerly used to project an enlarged image of a picture.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

magic lantern

n
(Photography) an early type of slide projector. Sometimes shortened to: lantern
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mag′ic lan′tern


n.
a device having a lamp and a lenslike opening, formerly used for projecting images on slides.
[1690–1700]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Magic lantern

An early version of a slide projector.
1001 Words and Phrases You Never Knew You Didn’t Know by W.R. Runyan Copyright © 2011 by W.R. Runyan
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Magic lantern - an early form of slide projectormagic lantern - an early form of slide projector  
slide projector - projector that projects an enlarged image of a slide onto a screen
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

magic lantern

nlanterna magica
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
O titulo da serie, "Lanterna magica", tambem indicia a deformacao dos elementos projetados no maquinario constituido pelos poemas.
De 1875 data la primera, A Lanterna Magica, con la que el humor en prensa conquista la mayoria de edad en Portugal.
A inquietacao sobre a relacao entre a lanterna magica no entretenimento popular e o projeto de slide no contexto cientifico moldou claramente as formas como as tecnologias foram consideradas no final do seculo XIX e, discutivelmente, desde entao.
Poeder en wind, which translates as "Dust and Wind," comes across as a lanterna magica show, a visual and descriptive display of objects hinting at a higher meaning, combined with an essay that examines the immortality of antiques, as well the ability of these antique objects to bestow at least a semblance of immortality on their owners: a history of man-made things is not just a history of their time and of the people who made them, after all, but also a history of their users and owners acting as temporary custodians.