Lao Tzu


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Lao Tzu

also Lao-tse or Lao·zi  (lou′dzŭ′) fl. sixth century bc?
Chinese philosopher who is traditionally regarded as the founder of Taoism. The Tao Te Ching is attributed to him.
References in periodicals archive ?
Lao Tzu uses the images of infancy, limitlessness and simplicity to describe the intuitive understanding of the great system: the unified field of matter and energy as it existed prior to the beginnings of the known universe.
Many great Chinese philosophers lived during this time including Confucius, Mencius, and Lao Tzu (Chen, 1994).
The Taoists Lao Tzu and Chuang Tzu, with their skepticism about government and their concept of the relativism of moral values, seem to contradict the Confucian vision.
The great Chinese philosopher Lao Tzu said, 'Life is a series of natural and spontaneous changes.
Shortly before he was sworn in as a police officer in the city, Officer Riggieri, quoting Lao Tzu, remembered the first steps of a long journey he took with the 16 other city police recruits and 24 more recruits from other cities and towns in his class.
Together the two thinkers draw on the wisdom of Shakyamuni Buddha, Lao Tzu, Confucius, Aristotle, Socrates, and others to make a compelling case for philosophy as a means of helping people draw on their own inner strength to overcome suffering, live victoriously, and create value for the world.
For several months I'd been reading a wonderful new translation of Lao Tzu by Ursula le Guin.
Collecting works by a wide variety of great authors, including Lao Tzu, Han Shan, Li Po, Dogen Kigen, Saigyo, and many more, The Poetry of Zen offers a cross-section of historical classics that all have in common a resonating theme conducive to meditation, reflection, and self-transformation.
Philosophical Taoism is based on the writings of Lao Tzu and Chuang Tzu and called for a return to primitive, preliterate social forms and abandonment of the conventional value system of their times.
4-kilogram Pearl of Lao Tzu, also known as the Pearl of Allah.
Lao Tzu, the teacher of Confucius, is thought to have written only 5,000 words in his lifetime, most of them in his Tao Te Ching ("The Book of the Way and Its Power"), a group of eighty-one short, poetic chapters.
If Lao Tzu is a smile, Chuang Tzu is a belly-laugh.