Lao Tzu

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Lao Tzu

also Lao-tse or Lao·zi  (lou′dzŭ′) fl. sixth century bc?
Chinese philosopher who is traditionally regarded as the founder of Taoism. The Tao Te Ching is attributed to him.
References in periodicals archive ?
The selection was made with the Western reader (both specialist and non-specialists) in mind: the original pattern of the work has been broken down and the translation reorganized into some sixty-five "essays," classified under six topical divisions, namely "General Issues of Aesthetics and Criticism," "Metaphor, Image, and the Psychology of Perception," "Semantics and Literary Stylistics," "On Laozi, with Reference to Buddhism and Other Mystical Philosophies," "The Demonic and the Divine' and "Society and Thought.
Zhang said, "The word tao is repeated three times in the first line of the Laozi, and the repetition certainly makes a serious point by playing on the two meanings of tao - tao as thinking and tao as the verb "to speak".
These included versions of the Laozi and the Yi jing (or Book of Changes).
The name was first used during the Han dynasty (206 BC-AD 220); it had previously been called Laozi in the belief that it was written by Laozi (Lao-tzu), but the problem of its authorship is still unresolved.
Others are simply incorrect, such as the misidentification of Confucius in his meeting with Laozi, from an album of hagiographical paintings that are not copies of murals (p.
Go East young 'man': Seek wisdom from Laozi and Buddha on how to metatheorize mediatization.
The core of Laozi and Zhuangzi's philosophy is "Tao" ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]), which is the law of the universe and the cause of all changes in the universe.
Subjects covered include use of the initial character Fu, Laozi, the Kongzi Shilun, the Fayan, and the Zhuangzi.
Thinkers as diverse as Confucius, Laozi, Buddha, Socrates, and the Hebrew prophets began to ask what it means to be human.
Speaking of the sages of antiquity who were intimately acquainted with Dao, (7) Laozi asked: "Who can still the muddied, slowly rendering it clear; who can stir the calm, slowly bringing it to life?
Foe es, obviamente, Buda, y el viejo de cabellos blancos, Laozi.
As Keping Wang tells it, American and other world leaders could learn from Laozi and Taoist philosophy which eschews war and violence.