Lapith

(redirected from Lapithae)

Lap·ith

 (lăp′ĭth)
n. Greek Mythology
One of a Thessalian tribe who at the disastrous wedding of their king defeated the drunken centaurs.
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Lapith

(ˈlæpɪθ)
n, pl Lapithae (ˈlæpɪˌθiː) or Lapiths
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a member of a people in Thessaly who at the wedding of their king, Pirithoüs, fought the drunken centaurs
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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(also ascribed by Athenaeus to Cercops of Miletus), is thought by Valckenaer to deal with the war of Aegimus against the Lapithae and the aid furnished to him by Heracles, and with the history of Aegimius and his sons.
The Argives, discomfited though they were, were forced to defend their ships, and all the gods who were defending the Achaeans were vexed in spirit; but the Lapithae kept on fighting with might and main.
It was wine that inflamed the Centaur Eurytion when he was staying with Peirithous among the Lapithae. When the wine had got into his head, he went mad and did ill deeds about the house of Peirithous; this angered the heroes who were there assembled, so they rushed at him and cut off his ears and nostrils; then they dragged him through the doorway out of the house, so he went away crazed, and bore the burden of his crime, bereft of understanding.
Although the centaur appears infrequently in Greek literature, it is often represented in art, usually in a herd and brawling with the Lapithae of Thessaly at weddings.