Lapland

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Lap·land

 (lăp′lănd′, -lənd)
A region of extreme northern Europe including northern Norway, Sweden, and Finland and the Kola Peninsula of northwest Russia. It is largely within the Arctic Circle and is the traditional homeland of the Sami.

Lap′land·er n.

Lapland

(ˈlæpˌlænd)
n
(Placename) an extensive region of N Europe, mainly within the Arctic Circle: consists of the N parts of Norway, Sweden, Finland, and the Kola Peninsula of the extreme NW of Russia. Also called (informal): Land of the Midnight Sun

Lap•land

(ˈlæpˌlænd)

n.
a region in N Norway, N Sweden, N Finland, and the Kola Peninsula of the NW Russian Federation in Europe: inhabited by Lapps.
Lap′land`er, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Lapland - a region in northmost Europe inhabited by LappsLapland - a region in northmost Europe inhabited by Lapps
Europe - the 2nd smallest continent (actually a vast peninsula of Eurasia); the British use `Europe' to refer to all of the continent except the British Isles
Lapp, Lapplander, Saame, Saami, Same, Sami - a member of an indigenous nomadic people living in northern Scandinavia and herding reindeer
Translations
Laponsko
Lappi
Finnmark
Laponia
Lappland

Lapland

[ˈlæplænd] NLaponia f

Lapland

[ˈlæplænd] nLaponie flap of honour n (British)tour m d'honneur

Lapland

nLappland nt

Lapland

[ˈlæpˌlænd] nLapponia
References in classic literature ?
However, I say I had not the least doubt of his sincerity and pious intentions; and I am firmly of opinion, if the rest of the Popish missionaries were like him, they would strive to visit even the poor Tartars and Laplanders, where they have nothing to give them, as well as covet to flock to India, Persia, China, &c., the most wealthy of the heathen countries; for if they expected to bring no gains to their Church by it, it may well be admired how they came to admit the Chinese Confucius into the calendar of the Christian saints.
In the winter bleakness a hunger for colour came over people, like the Laplander's craving for fats and sugar.
Some gamesome wights will tell you that they have to plant weeds there, they don't grow naturally; that they import Canada thistles; that they have to send beyond seas for a spile to stop a leak in an oil cask; that pieces of wood in Nantucket are carried about like bits of the true cross in Rome; that people there plant toadstools before their houses, to get under the shade in summer time; that one blade of grass makes an oasis, three blades in a day's walk a prairie; that they wear quicksand shoes, something like Laplander snowshoes; that they are so shut up, belted about, every way inclosed, surrounded, and made an utter island of by the ocean, that to their very chairs and tables small clams will sometimes be found adhering, as to the backs of sea turtles.
Samuel Laing says that "the Laplander in his skin dress, and in a skin bag which he puts over his head and shoulders, will sleep night after night on the snow ...
Originally, Murmansk was all about fur trapping and reindeer herding: the region's traditional inhabitants (who, following the Paris Peace Treaties of 1947, were given the option to stay in Soviet Russia or resettle in Finland) the semi-nomadic Laplanders.
The moment you step into Santa Claus Village, and thus the Arctic Circle, you realise Laplanders can't do tacky - there's too much beautiful pine furniture everywhere and too many centuries of sensible reindeer husbandry in their genes for that.
Carnoluskij's notes, for instance, we find the following passage: "The movements of the Laplanders apparently have nothing in common with those of the Ter Coast people.
Indeed, the Laplanders have been encouraging them to nest in such boxes for many years now, in order to procure their eggs!
Laplanders in Finland until the year 1945 [in Finnish].
(1) Later in the opening session, a young man also in traditional dress presented several jojking, like kulning, an unaccompanied textless vocalism, but in this case traditional work songs originating among the Sami and Laplanders of northern Scandinavia.
This lyrical portrait of a family reveals the assimilation of the Saami people, who are sometimes referred to by the more derogatory term of Laplanders.