References in periodicals archive ?
About their etymological equivalents outside Sinitic and Finnic: [[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (yun/uan/ala/ala) (5)] has also been identified in many other Uralic languages ([??] Sino-Finnic): Lappic vuollel 'under', vuole/viille 'lower part', viilne/vuiln/vueiln/voiln/ 'under'; Mordvin al 'nether', alo/ala 'under'; Mari ul-/ulo- 'nether', ulna/ulno 'under'; Udmurt ul 'nether', ulin/ulan 'under'; Komi ulin/uvin 'under'; Mansi jala'n/joln/jalan/jalan 'below'; Khanty il/it/il 'nether'; Hungarian al- 'sub-'; Nenets nil-/nir- 'nether', yilna 'under'; Enets ido/iro 'bottom', isone 'under'; Nganasan nilea 'nether', nileanu 'under'; Selkup iil/il/rl 'bottom'; Kamas jilda 'downwards'; Yukaghir -al 'under'.
[[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] (kun/con/kala/kala)] has also been identified in many other Uralic languages ([??] Sino-Finnic): Lappic guoli, -e/kuolle/kiille/kuill/kuoill 'fish';
They contain all we have in our everyday experience - people, buildings, plants, warmth, light, water, smell - and can transform it into something of a higher quality than so-called reality." So, the "Lappic princess" is not only a role that can to be played in order to survive a rainy Sunday full of conventional obligations; it is also a parallel-world reality, that can be entered without knocking and exited without hindrance.
(2) Such alternations occur in most Finnic languages, in Lappic, in Nganasan, and in Ket Selkup although not all inflected words undergo gradation in these languages.
The labial vowel is suggested first of all by the vowel o that corresponds to the vowels [??] ~ i in the 1st and 2nd person singular personal pronouns in Lappic and Mordvinic (North Lapp mon, don; Erzya and Moksha mon, ton).
Everywhere else, except for Puhalepa, breaking has taken place also for the long vowel, and the breaking of long [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII.] and [??] is an interesting areal phenomenon in Finnic, Lappic, Baltic, and also Slavic languages.