Fall of Man

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Noun1.Fall of Man - (Judeo-Christian mythology) when Adam and Eve ate of the fruit of the tree of knowledge of good and evil in the Garden of Eden, God punished them by driving them out of the Garden of Eden and into the world where they would be subject to sickness and pain and eventual deathFall of Man - (Judeo-Christian mythology) when Adam and Eve ate of the fruit of the tree of knowledge of good and evil in the Garden of Eden, God punished them by driving them out of the Garden of Eden and into the world where they would be subject to sickness and pain and eventual death
Old Testament - the collection of books comprising the sacred scripture of the Hebrews and recording their history as the chosen people; the first half of the Christian Bible
turning point, landmark, watershed - an event marking a unique or important historical change of course or one on which important developments depend; "the agreement was a watershed in the history of both nations"
References in periodicals archive ?
The show, for which Greenfield culled photographs from these past twenty-five years of material, is arranged as a kind of lapsarian cycle.
Seduction thus differs substantially from temptation and corruption, processes that often characterize the lapsarian portions of religious or mythological narratives.
This lapsarian narrative, as she demonstrates, relies on a series of interlocking binaries: Europe and the United States, art and commerce, and theater and film.
The lapsarian world is the crucial backdrop of Virgil's Georgics.
Given the logic of the exhibition, the "Fall" can encompass any number of lapsarian or Freudian interpretations (including the name of the legendary U.K.
In the poem's 1923 text, the cards offer a desire for origin conveyed through the Bible's lapsarian vocabulary, as the painted amulets summon a "realidad primordial / de goce y sufrimiento carnales / y una risuena genesis" (4-6).
(9) This lapsarian fantasy of regression to a primordial condition--visualised in the elemental waters and swamp of the final scenes of the film--pertains to the horror genre, but more specifically to the pre-history of the contemporary horror film: the literary tradition of the gothic.
Tennyson's affirmation of doubt is also, at the same time, an affirmation of faith, of faith in doubt and faith in faith's immanence in the manifestation of doubt" (60)--all this is before an excursion into Kantian concepts of analogous religious discourse, wherein we learn that the poet's "formal materiality recognizes the lapsarian dangers attendant in matters of belief, and so the material marking of the text seeks to affirm the sublime through a resistance to the coherence of anthropomorphic or theomorphic representation" (65).
This borrows no particular phrase from Dickens but instead fastens on hunger, not only on various instances of it in the novels but also on its role in the ideology of the age, succinctly gathered under the mutually supporting headings of the capitalist, utilitarian, lapsarian, and malthusian.
Salusinszky characterizes Murnane's writing as emphatically concerned with spatialization: for Australia in particular and Western lapsarian traditions in general, historical awareness is a function of displacement and occupation.
Within the lapsarian's cry of rejection there may be heard the murmur of assent.
'Lawless Lands: Violent Crime, Social Deviance and the "Lapsarian" Attack on Respectability in Selected Australian and New Zealand Fiction, 1829-1984' (1989) 2 vols.