Larix laricina


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Related to Larix laricina: Larix occidentalis, American larch, Tamarack Larch
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Noun1.Larix laricina - medium-sized larch of Canada and northern United States including Alaska having a broad conic crown and rust-brown scaly barkLarix laricina - medium-sized larch of Canada and northern United States including Alaska having a broad conic crown and rust-brown scaly bark
larch tree, larch - any of numerous conifers of the genus Larix all having deciduous needlelike leaves
References in periodicals archive ?
To prepare feedstock for the tamarack (Larix laricina) OSB panels, six mature (90-yr-old) and six juvenile (30-yr-old) trees were selected from the Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada, area.
Lowland vegetation is a mosaic of shrub and young forest dominated by seres, climax bogs, and mature black spruce (Picea mariana) and eastern larch (Larix laricina) forest.
Asi mismo, Eysteinsson y Greenwood (1995), Rodriguez (2001) y Pijut (2002), lograron un aumento de la floracion femenina y tambien un incremento de estrobilos masculinos en las ramas tratadas con estas giberelinas, en Larix laricina (Du Roi) K.
Flavopunctelia soredica (Nyl.) Hale--Corticolous (Larix laricina).
Candidate species include those now known to exist north of the treeline in Arctic Alaska, such as balsam poplar, trembling aspen, and white spruce, as well as those that may become established by the end of the century, such as Alaska paper birch (Betula neoalaskana), black spruce (Picea mariana), or American larch (Larix laricina).
(13) In the early days of the Settlement, lowland peat bogs probably covered two-thirds of this land, supporting black spruce (Picea mariana), tamarack/larch (Larix laricina), and eastern white cedar (Thuja occidentalis).
Keywords: Peatland, bog, Sphagnum, Larix laricina, succession
H+ (yellow pond-lilly) Pinaceae Larix laricina (DuRoi) K.Koch K- (tamarack) Rosaceae Potentilla fruticosa L.
For instance, root mass of tamarack (Larix laricina) seedlings was reduced due to flooding compared to non-flooded seedlings (Islam and MacDonald, 2004).
Normally found much further north into Canada, Larix laricina has short pine needles and small cones--and is one of the very few conifers that sheds its needles every winter.