Larrea tridentata


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Related to Larrea tridentata: creosote bush
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Noun1.Larrea tridentata - desert shrub of southwestern United States and New Mexico having persistent resinous aromatic foliage and small yellow flowersLarrea tridentata - desert shrub of southwestern United States and New Mexico having persistent resinous aromatic foliage and small yellow flowers
genus Larrea, Larrea - xerophytic evergreen shrubs; South America to southwestern United States
Sonora gum - acidulous gum resin of the creosote bush
bush, shrub - a low woody perennial plant usually having several major stems
References in periodicals archive ?
Or look for creosote bush (Larrea tridentata)--it has tiny yellow flowers, plus leaves that exude a distinctive scent after desert storms.
Larrea tridentata, locally known as 'gobernadora', is a desert shrub widely found in the deserts of Mojave in the USA (Tequida-Meneses et al., 2002) and of Sonora and Chihuahua in Mexico (Tequida-Meneses et al., 2002), and has shown to have antifungal activity (Vargas-Arispuro et al., 2005; Saldivar et al., 2006; Osorio et al., 2010) mainly against Aspergillus flavus, A.
El tercer registro se logro documentar el 18 de septiembre del 2017 a las 20:06 horas cerca de la comunidad La Victoria, el animal se encontraba en un area con mezquitales (Prosopis spp.) y gobernadoras (Larrea tridentata) de porte bajo (N 25[grados] 53' 16.55", W 103[grados] 35' 47.65", a una altitud de 1,113 m).
Materials and Methods-On 57 days from March 13-May 25, 2016, I climbed to Usery Peak (elevation = 901 m; coordinates = 33[degrees]30'07.8"N, 111[degrees]38'23.9"W) in the Tonto National Forest near Mesa, Arizona to census the tarantula hawks that were occupying and defending certain of the foothills' palo verdes (Parkinsonia microphylla), creosote bushes (Larrea tridentata), wolfberries (Lycium species), and jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis).
TABLE 1: Plant-derived natural products approved for therapeutic use Trade name/Year Generic name Plant species of introduction Indication Artemisinin Artemisia annua Artemisinin-1987 Malaria treatment Capsaicin Capsicum annuum Qutenza-2010 Postherpetic neuralgia Galantamine Galanthus Razadyne-2001 Dementia caucasicus associated with ALZ Ingenol Euphorbia peplus Picato-2012 Actinic mebutate keratosis Paclitaxel Taxus brevifolia Taxol-1993 Cancer Abraxane-2005 chemotherapy Nanoxel-2007 Masoprocol Larrea tridentata Actinex-1992 Cancer chemotherapy Source: Atanasov et al.
Esta ciudad esta una altitud promedio de 200 m; y en areas urbanas y periurbanas se presentan mosaicos de vegetacion secundaria con especies representativas como: Larrea tridentata, Opuntia spp., Prosopis velutina., Encelia farinosa., Olneya tesota, Caesalpinia spp., Bursera spp., Washingtonia spp., Ceiba spp., Tamarix spp., Guaiacum spp., Pithecellobium spp., Parkinsonia spp., Cylindropuntia spp.
Por ejemplo, en suelos Rc+I/2 (Regosol calcarico + Litosol, textura media) las especies con los valores IVI y densidad mas altos fueron: Larrea tridentata (23.31%; 1370 N/ha); Koeberlinia spinosa (17.01%; 623 N/ha) y Agave lecheguilla (10.17%; 1270 N/ha), mientras que en los suelos E+I/2 L (Rendzina + Litosol, textura media, litico) los valores mas relevantes los obtuvieron las especies: Agave lecheguilla (16.52%; 4414 N/ha), Larrea tridentata (13.13%; 1032 N/ha) y Leucophyllum frutescens (9.37%; 1032 N/ha).
Larrea tridentata, which grows in some desert areas of southwest United States and northern Mexico as well as in some areas of Argentina (Arteaga et al.
From 1997 to 1998, we carried out a study of the phytophagous insect community in an arid ecosystem located in New Mexico dominated by creosote bush (Larrea tridentata (Moc.
Larrea tridentata has been introduced as a dietary supplement, mainly due to its antioxidant activity (Arteaga et al.
Larrea tridentata, also known as creosote bush, was used by the Pima Indians in the form of an "infusion of the plant held in the mouth for toothaches." (5) The Alabama Indians used the bark of Zanthoxylum americanum, (toothache tree/prickly ash) as packing in cavities and around teeth for toothaches.
* MARTINS, S., Kinetic study of nordihydroguaiaretic acid recovery from Larrea tridentata by microwave-assisted extraction.