Late Latin


Also found in: Thesaurus, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Late Latin: Low Latin

Late Latin

n.
The Latin language as used from the third to the seventh century ad.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Late Latin

n
(Languages) the form of written Latin used from the 3rd to the 7th centuries ad. See also Biblical Latin, Medieval Latin
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Late′ Lat′in


n.
the Latin of the late Western Roman Empire and of patristic literature, from about a.d. 150 to 700. Abbr.: LL
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Late Latin - the form of Latin written between the 3rd and 8th centuriesLate Latin - the form of Latin written between the 3rd and 8th centuries
Latin - any dialect of the language of ancient Rome
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
myöhäislatina

Late Latin

nSpätlatein nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
This variant, in turn, seems to be further transmitted by Richard Methley's translation from the Middle English into Late Latin, dating to 1491: "si in vobis inuenissset tantum in vanum, quantum est minimus neuus in ornatu capitis mulieris, excepta necessitate, nunquam de vobis fecisset Matrem suam" [if he had found in you (even) so much in vain as the smallest speck on a woman's head covering, except out of necessity, he would never have made you his mother].
The proboscis of an insect, from the Late Latin for "drainer"
(Late Latin satyrisis, from Greek saturisis, from saturos, satyr)
The common term cinaedus also persisted into Gallo-Latin and Frankish for a short while beyond the Late Latin period until it was replaced by sodomita, introduced into Francia from the Celtic christian church at about the 6th century.
English acquired the word from Old French estor 'provisions' which was derived from the Late Latin staurum 'store,' a noun associated with the verb instaurare 'to provide necessities.' And this word was derived from the Greek stauros which Biblical scholars would recognise as the word for the Cross.
Neruda scholar Mark Eisner has created a straightforward, well-crafted overview of the great late Latin American poet's life, work and times in this new documentary.
The biblical scholar William Tyndale, in preparing his 1530 translation of the Pentateuch, coined scapegoat as a calque of the Late Latin (Vulgate) caper emissarius 'emissary goat,' itself a calque of Hebrew 'azazel, the name of a desert demon which, etymologically, was understood as 'ez ozel 'goat that departs'--whence emissary goat, whence scapegoat, whence any person, place, or thing that bears the blame for others.
Agricola's letters could serve admirably as teaching tools for late Latin, and the editorial work as a salutary example of care and respect for sources.
Television comes from the Greek 'tele' (far), 'vision' from the French-Latin 'vision' (to see), motor comes from the Latin 'motor-movere' (to move), car from the old French 'carre' - Late Latin 'carra', a Celtic word seen in Irish 'carr' and Breton 'Karr'.
The English word lunatic is derived from Late Latin lunaticus, corresponding to the English term "moonstruck," i.e.
Accompanying the letters are a number of verse compositions comprising "responses," that function like the "missives" themselves, epitaphs, and, in the case of Catherine des Roches, several poems inspired by classical models, most notably an ambitious translation into 1480 alexandrins of the late Latin poet Claudian's unfinished epic, De raptu Proserpinae.