malleolus

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Related to Lateral malleolus: Medial malleolus

mal·le·o·lus

 (mə-lē′ə-ləs)
n. pl. mal·le·o·li (-lī′)
Either of the two rounded protuberances on each side of the ankle, the inner formed by a projection of the tibia and the outer by a projection of the fibula.

[New Latin, from Latin, diminutive of malleus, hammer; see melə- in Indo-European roots.]

mal·le′o·lar (-ə-lər) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

malleolus

(məˈliːələs)
n, pl -li (-ˌlaɪ)
(Anatomy) either of two rounded bony projections of the tibia and fibula on the sides of each ankle joint
[C17: diminutive of Latin malleus hammer]
malˈleolar adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

mal•le•o•lus

(məˈli ə ləs)

n., pl. -li (-ˌlaɪ)
the bony protuberance on either side of the ankle formed by the lower leg bones.
[1685–95; < Latin: small hammer, mallet]
mal•le′o•lar, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

mal·le·o·lus

n. maléolo, protuberancia en forma de martillo tal como la que se ve a ambos lados de los tobillos.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

malleolus

n maléolo; lateral — maléolo externo; medial — maléolo interno
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
This tendon descends posterior to the lateral malleolus of the fibula, anterior to the juxtaposed and more rounded inserting tendon of fibularis longus.
(13) The examiner should also palpate the Achilles tendon, peroneal tendons just posterior to the lateral malleolus, and the tibialis posterior tendon just posterior to the medial malleolus to inspect for tenderness or defects that may be signs of injury to these tendons.
Case 3 revealed thickening and fissuring of the skin of the soles along with psoriasiform erythematous scaly plaques on dorsal surface of both big toes and left lateral malleolus. Diffuse thickening of the skin of palms were present in all cases.
* On the sagittal plane are observed: lateral malleolus, the axis of knee joint and the axis of hip joint.
The markers were positioned over the lateral border of the arm (between the humeral epicondyle and the acromioclavicular joint markers), acromioclavicular joint, second metacarpal, lateral epicondyle of the humerus, the lateral border of the thigh (between the femoral epicondyle and anterior superior iliac spines), anterior/posterior superior iliac spines, the lateral border of the leg (between the lateral malleolus and femoral epicondyle markers), second metatarsal head, calcaneus, lateral malleolus, lateral epicondyle of the femur.
Retroreflective markers were placed over anatomical landmarks bilaterally according to the Plug-In-Gait (PIG) model (Oxford Metrics), which includes the following: second metatarsal head, calcaneus, lateral malleolus, lateral epicondyle of the femur, a marker on the lateral border of the leg (between the lateral malleolus and femoral epicondyle markers), anterior/posterior superior iliac spines, a marker on the lateral border of the thigh (between the femoral epicondyle and anterior superior iliac spines), second metacarpal, lateral epicondyle of the humerus, acromioclavicular joint, and a marker on the lateral border of the arm (between the humeral epicondyle and the acromioclavicular joint markers).
The physical examination revealed localized swelling and tenderness on the distal fibula about 5 cm proximal to the tip of the left lateral malleolus.
The reference points were marked using a skin marker, and it included lateral malleolus, anterior superior and posterior superior iliac spines and cervical (C5 and C7) vertebrae.
(6) A typical goniometric measurement of the ankle is made with the patient's leg supine on the treatment table and the fulcrum at the lateral malleolus whilst maintaining the bottom rod of the goniometer parallel with the tibia and fibula.
Hospital number: Surname Name Scan date: Involvement (yes/no) Subluxation (yes/no) Pattern I Pattern II Pattern III Pattern IV Pattern V Not applicable Semiquantitative score BMO score (0-2) Fracture score (0-2) Medial sesamoid Lateral sesamoid Proximal phalanx 1 Proximal phalanx 2 Proximal phalanx 3 Proximal phalanx 4 Proximal phalanx 5 Metatarsal 1 Metatarsal 2 Metatarsal 3 Metatarsal 4 Metatarsal 5 Medial cuneiform Intermediate cuneiform Lateral cuneiform Cuboid Navicular Talus Calcaneum Tibial plafond Medial malleolus Lateral malleolus Total score = sum of all scores Table 2: Interobserver agreement for the total BMO score and total fracture score for all observers and for the three pairs of observers.
We recorded the position of 22 reflective markers positioned on the patient body according to the Davis protocol [14] for 3D gait and posture analysis: spinal process of sacrum, spinal process of C7, acromion (both sides), anterior superior iliac spine, greater trochanter, lateral epicondyle of the femur, fibula head, lateral malleolus, and fifth metatarsal phalangeal joint of the foot.
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