Epicurus

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Related to Lathe biosas: Epikuros

Ep·i·cu·rus

 (ĕp′ĭ-kyo͝or′əs) 341?-270 bc.
Greek philosopher who founded his influential school of Epicureanism in Athens (c. 306) and a utopian community called "The Garden."
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Epicurus

(ˌɛpɪˈkjʊərəs)
n
(Biography) 341–270 bc, Greek philosopher, who held that the highest good is pleasure and that the world is a series of fortuitous combinations of atoms
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Ep•i•cu•rus

(ˌɛp ɪˈkyʊər əs)

n.
342?–270 B.C., Greek philosopher.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Epicurus - Greek philosopher who believed that the world is a random combination of atoms and that pleasure is the highest good (341-270 BC)Epicurus - Greek philosopher who believed that the world is a random combination of atoms and that pleasure is the highest good (341-270 BC)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
Epikúros
Epikuros

Epicurus

[ˌɛpɪˈkjʊərəs] nEpicuro
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Over against a neo-Stoic such as Justus Lipsius, Montaigne defends the home as the safe locus for 'a self that is at ease with itself' (35), recalling the Epicurean maxim lathe biosas. Thus, John Guillory, writing on Francis Bacon, takes an angle where bachelorhood and friendship, philia or amicitia become central if not necessary, over the married life, for the natural philosopher.
His followers' motto was lathe biosas ("live unseen").