Laudian


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Laudian

(ˈlɔːdɪən)
adj
(Anglicanism) Church of England of or relating to the High-Church standards set up for the Church of England by Archbishop Laud
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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He identifies John Donne's Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions as participating in a renewed emphasis on private confession in the Laudian Church, and calls attention to the gap between the direct reception of Adam and Eve's penitential prayer in John Milton's Paradise Lost and the necessity of mediation for Spenser's Redcrosse Knight in the House of Holiness, as indicative of the internal variations within Protestant treatments of confession.
Sermons by the local Calvinist militants Robert Bolton and Joseph Bentham, the moderate Puritan Edward Reynolds, and the Arminian conformist Peter Hausted are read alongside the spiritual diary of the Northampton steward Robert Woodford, the devotional confessions of the godly Elizabeth Isham, and the unpublished letters of the Laudian controversialist Robert Sibthorpe.
The University of Oxford had recently conferred the honor of "Laudian Professor of Arabic" upon Al-Babtain, the highlight of a career dedicated to developing the Arabic language.
The Ashmole collection was indexed in 1992, "smaller Bodleian collections" in 1998, and the Laudian collection in 2000 (IMEP 9,12,16).
In the same year Margoliouth applied, unsuccessfully, for the chair of the Laudian professor of Arabic in Oxford, to which he was appointed two years later.
(9) In the rush to issue more licences in 1633, this must have been an oversight, given Thomas's pronounced lack of sympathy for Laudian policies.
However, the strictest Laudian bishops such as Matthew Wren were not great ordainers, perhaps because of the very high standards they upheld for aspiring clerics, and the work of providing a properly ordained ministry was mostly carried out by English moderates and a few Scottish and Irish bishops.
Elizabeth's via media brought comfort to many, but that stability gave way to Laudian finery, then Puritan ascendancy, followed by Restoration and another reaction.
Among specific topics are the city and its schools, poetry and imitation, Platonic themes and variations, medicine and astrology, the purpose of natural science, the Trinity, the Incarnation, the function of integumentum, quotation and imitation, the standard and Laudian glosses, and Alan of Lille and Peter Lombard.
Nicholas McDowell describes Milton's engagement with the baroque idiom of Laudian poetics in which "Crashaw excelled and Milton stuttered" (9), and argues that Milton had a "tendency toward Laudian ritualism" (inspired by his father).
By comparing Milton's early devotional lyrics with those of other 17th century Cambridge poets, the ascription of a Laudian idiom to him adds to the debate on how radical the young Milton might have been.