Launcelot


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Related to Launcelot: Sir Launcelot
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Launcelot

[ˈlɑːnslət] NLanzarote
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Exactly as I would speak of my nearest personal friends or enemies, or my most familiar neighbors, he spoke of Sir Bedivere, Sir Bors de Ganis, Sir Launcelot of the Lake, Sir Galahad, and all the other great names of the Table Round -- and how old, old, unspeakably old and faded and dry and musty and ancient he came to look as he went on
HOW SIR LAUNCELOT SLEW TWO GIANTS, AND MADE A CASTLE FREE
Sir Launcelot put his shield afore him, and put the stroke away of the one giant, and with his sword he clave his head asunder.
On the morn Sir Launcelot arose early, and left Sir Kay sleeping; and Sir Launcelot took Sir Kay's armor and his shield and armed him, and so he went to the stable and took his horse, and took his leave of his host, and so he departed.
The antique volume which I had taken up was the "Mad Trist" of Sir Launcelot Canning; but I had called it a favourite of Usher's more in sad jest than in earnest; for, in truth, there is little in its uncouth and unimaginative prolixity which could have had interest for the lofty and spiritual ideality of my friend.
At the termination of this sentence I started, and for a moment, paused; for it appeared to me (although I at once concluded that my excited fancy had deceived me)--it appeared to me that, from some very remote portion of the mansion, there came, indistinctly, to my ears, what might have been, in its exact similarity of character, the echo (but a stifled and dull one certainly) of the very cracking and ripping sound which Sir Launcelot had so particularly described.
Having rapidly taken notice of all this, I resumed the narrative of Sir Launcelot, which thus proceeded:
Tel: 024 76 367149 HODGSON Launcelot Innes Passed away peacefully on the 20th November.
The obvious connections of this episode to a cognate one of Guinevere and Launcelot in Malory are first, an underlying sexual dimension, existent and basic in Morte D'Arthur, non-existent but lurking in Morte D'Urban; second, the alikeness of Guinevere and Sally, Guinevere, believing Gawain's untrue tale that Elaine is Launcelot's love, considers herself a spurned woman and argues bitterly with Launcelot who departs in anger.
Guenevere and Launcelot have been caught together, and Guenevere is now on trial for treason.
His second watercolour, Sir Launcelot in the Queen's Chamber (1857), shows the lovers hiding while Arthur's knights try to break into the room to uncover their adultery.