Laurasia


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Related to Laurasia: Panthalassa

Laur·a·sia

 (lô-rā′zhə)
n.
The supercontinent of the Northern Hemisphere that, according to the theory of plate tectonics, broke up into North America, Greenland, Europe, and Asia except for the Indian subcontinent.

[New Latin Laur(entia), geologic precursor of North America (after the Saint Lawrence River) + (Eur)asia.]

Laurasia

(lɔːˈreɪʃə)
n
(Placename) one of the two ancient supercontinents produced by the first split of the even larger supercontinent Pangaea about 200 million years ago, comprising what are now North America, Greenland, Europe, and Asia (excluding India). See also Gondwanaland, Pangaea
[C20: from New Latin Laur(entia) (referring to the ancient N American landmass, from Laurentian strata of the Canadian Shield) + (Eur)asia]

Laur•a•sia

(lɔˈreɪ ʒə, -ʃə)

n.
a hypothetical landmass in the Northern Hemisphere that separated near the end of the Paleozoic Era to form North America and Eurasia.
[< German (1928), b. Laurentia the forerunner of the North American continent (see Laurentian) and Eurasia]

Laur·a·sia

(lô-rā′zhə)
A supercontinent of the Northern Hemisphere made up of the landmasses that currently correspond to North America, Greenland, Europe, and Asia (except India). According to the theory of plate tectonics, Laurasia formed at the end of the Precambrian Eon and broke up in the middle of the Mesozoic Era. Compare Gondwanaland.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Laurasia - a hypothetical continent that (according to plate tectonic theory) broke up later into North America and Europe and Asia
northern hemisphere - the hemisphere that is to the north of the equator
References in periodicals archive ?
This has suggested that when the earth was divided into two supercontinents, Laurasia and Gondwana, thyreophorans were more common and diverse in Laurasia.
First described by Melchior Neumayr in 1885 (3) as a Jurassic seaway, the Tethys Ocean was the large ocean body between the ancient continents of Gondwana and Laurasia. Displaced by plate tectonics over many millennia, the Black, Caspian, and Aral seas are thought to be the surviving remnants of the Tethys.
The evolution of tetrapods - four legged vertebrates- from fishes was a key event in human ancestry and for a long time scientists have assumed that they had originated in Laurasia - the smaller supercontinent which included modern day North America, Greenland and Europe.
However, similar pollen has also been reported from Southern Laurasia, where the climate was cooler (subtropical?) and more humid, including the Barremian of England, as Barremian-r/ng (Hughes, 1994), and the Albian of Hungary, as Transitoripollis (Goczan & Juhasz, 1984).
The spiders that ended up on the northern continent of Laurasia (which became North America, Europe and Asia) eventually went extinct.
Pangea primero se habria separado en dos grandes masas (Laurasia y Gondwana) que habrian continuado fragmentandose y derivando hasta alcanzar sus configuracion y posiciones actuales (Hongn y Garcia, 2011; Rabassa, 2010).
The second volume focuses on the Laurasiatheria, placental mammals that originated on the northern supercontinent of Laurasia. ([umlaut] Ringgold, Inc., Portland, OR)
During the Maastrichtian time, the globe can be tectonically divided into two distinct hemispheres; one dominated by deep oceanic basin of the Pacific and the other consisting of well-dispersed continents originated form Laurasia and Gondwana (Hunter et al., 2008).
that have been become distributed worldwide presumably by human activities, all members of the tribe are exclusively found in Laurasia (Deharveng et al.
The Northern Hemisphere was largely shaped by another supercontinent called Laurasia. Both continents once formed a single supercontinent called Pangaea before breaking apart.
In "The Cartographer's Paradox", Samanta becomes a mapmaker, transforming the current world into the historical Gondwana and Laurasia, creating an atlas with nations without borders, where he floats without restrictions (figure 4).