jus sanguinis

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jus sanguinis

(ˈsæŋɡwɪnɪs)
n
(Law) law the principle that a person's nationality at birth is the same as that of his or her natural parents. Compare jus soli
[Latin, literally: law of blood]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

jus′ san′gui•nis

(ˈsæŋ gwə nɪs)

n.
the principle that the country of nationality of a child is determined by the country of nationality of the parents.
[1900–05; < Latin: right of blood]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.jus sanguinis - the principle that a person's nationality at birth is the same as that of his natural parents
judicial doctrine, judicial principle, legal principle - (law) a principle underlying the formulation of jurisprudence
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is the aim of Johann Chapoutot's The Law of Blood to "to take seriously the texts, the images, and the words of the Nazis" (408).
Here, then, was the law of blood. It was a rejection of Christianity and a return to nature, a collapsing of the bourgeois distinction between public and private, and a reunification of the past, the present, and the world to come.
Johann Chapoutot and Miranda Richmond Mouillot (translator); THE LAW OF BLOOD; Belknap Press (Nonfiction: Social Science) 35.00 ISBN: 9780674660434
The law of blood is transubstantiated into the law of the Father.
(10.) See John Phillip Reid, A Law of Blood: The Primitive Law of the Cherokee Nation (DeKalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 2006), who points out that the pro-American argument is undermined by Ward's failure to save the boy (188).
Kathryn Holland Braund (Tuscaloosa: University of Alabama Press, 2005), 184-5; John Philip Reid, A Law of Blood: The Primitive Law of the Cherokee Nation (New York: New York University Press, 1970), 73-112; Yasuhide Kawashima, Puritan Justice and the Indian: White Man's Law in Massachusetts, 1630-1763 (Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 1986), 3-20; Daniel Richter, The Ordeal of the Longhouse: The Peoples of the Iroquois League in the Era of European Colonization (Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press, 1992), 32-33.

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