legal tender

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legal tender

n.
Currency, such as coin and paper money, declared by law to be valid and sufficient for the payment of debts.

legal tender

n
(Currencies) currency in specified denominations that a creditor must by law accept in redemption of a debt

le′gal ten′der


n.
currency that may be lawfully tendered in payment of a debt, such as paper money or coins.
[1730–40]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.legal tender - something that can be used as an official medium of paymentlegal tender - something that can be used as an official medium of payment
medium of exchange, monetary system - anything that is generally accepted as a standard of value and a measure of wealth in a particular country or region
food stamp - a government-issued stamp that can be used in exchange for food

legal tender

noun currency, money, medium, payment, specie When did the note cease to be legal tender?
References in classic literature ?
You're a responsible party, and in such a case lawful money and lawful notice are pretty much the same.
He also attempted to reassure people that those who had lawful money would have nothing to fear.
00), then, prior to the commencement of work under the contract, the successful contractor will execute and provide to SCBE a good and solvent bond to the effect that the successful contractor will pay for all the labor and materials used by the successful contractor or by any subcontractor, immediate or remote, in connection with the contract, in lawful money of the United States, as required by Section 12-4-118 of the Tennessee Code Annotated.
1 believe that he and I agree that nothing except political blowback from the Established Orders prevents the States from making gold and silver coins at least lawful money and even a legal tender within their boundaries.
greenbacks and specie, city reserve banks could split their reserves into a minimum of 50 percent lawful money and up to 50 percent in interest-paying deposits at central reserve city banks Country banks had a minimum of only 40 percent lawful money reserves and could keep up to 60 percent in interest-paying deposits at either central reserve city or city reserve banks (Friedman and Schwartz [1963] 1993, pp.