combatant

(redirected from Lawful combatant)
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com·bat·ant

 (kəm-băt′nt, kŏm′bə-tnt)
n.
One, such as a person or a combat vehicle, that takes part in armed strife.
adj.
Engaging in armed strife.

combatant

(ˈkɒmbətənt; ˈkʌm-)
n
a person or group engaged in or prepared for a fight, struggle, or dispute
adj
engaged in or ready for combat

com•bat•ant

(kəmˈbæt nt, ˈkɒm bə tənt)

n.
1. one prepared for or engaged in active combat.
adj.
2. engaged in combat; fighting.
3. disposed to combat; combative.
[1425–75; late Middle English < Middle French]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.combatant - someone who fights (or is fighting)combatant - someone who fights (or is fighting)
individual, mortal, person, somebody, someone, soul - a human being; "there was too much for one person to do"
defender, withstander - a fighter who holds out against attack
boxer, pugilist - someone who fights with his fists for sport
brawler - a fighter (especially one who participates in brawls)
butter - a fighter who strikes the opponent with his head
fencer, swordsman - someone skilled at fencing
gladiator - (ancient Rome) a professional combatant or a captive who entertained the public by engaging in mortal combat
gouger - an attacker who gouges out the antagonist's eye
hell-kite, hell-rooster, gamecock - someone who is a very fierce fighter
mauler - a fighter who batters the opponent; "Jack Dempsey was called a mauler"
skirmisher - someone who skirmishes (e.g., as a member of a scouting party)
tough, street fighter - someone who learned to fight in the streets rather than being formally trained in the sport of boxing
victor, master, superior - a combatant who is able to defeat rivals
grappler, matman, wrestler - combatant who tries to throw opponent to the ground
Adj.1.combatant - engaging in or ready for combat
military - associated with or performed by members of the armed services as contrasted with civilians; "military police"

combatant

noun
1. fighter, soldier, warrior, contender, gladiator, belligerent, antagonist, fighting man, serviceman or servicewoman His grandfather was a Boer war combatant.
adjective
1. fighting, warring, battling, conflicting, opposing, contending, belligerent, combative the monitoring of ceasefires between combatant states

combatant

noun
One who engages in a combat or struggle:
adjective
Of or engaged in warfare:
Idiom: at war.
Translations
مُقاتِل، مُحارِب، مُتشاجِر
bojovník
kæmpendekombatant
bardagamaîur
mücadelecisavaşcı

combatant

[ˈkɒmbətənt] Ncombatiente mf

combatant

[ˈkɒmbətənt]
ncombattant(e) m/fcombat boots nplrangers fplcombat fatigues battle fatigues npltreillis mcombat gear ntenue f de combat

combatant

n (lit, fig)Kombattant m

combatant

[ˈkɒmbətnt] ncombattente m/f

combat

(ˈkombӕt) , ((American) kəmˈbat) noun
(an act of) fighting. The two knights met each other in single combat.
verb
to fight against; to oppose. The residents of the town tried to combat the government's plans to build a motorway.
combatant (ˈkombətənt) , ((American) kəmˈbӕtənt) noun
a person who is fighting. They eventually separated the combatants.
References in periodicals archive ?
hand, this requirement of lawful combatant status does not apply when
Therefore, under the Convention, he wasn't a lawful combatant and his conduct wasn't lawful.
Even by the generous standards of the fourth Geneva Convention, Omar Khadr was not a lawful combatant, though combatant he was.
According to Article 43(2) of Additional Protocol I, a lawful combatant who has the right to participate directly in hostilities must be a member of the armed forces of a party to the conflict.
(168) In any case, the prospect of being recognized as a lawful combatant would arguably offer a powerful incentive to comply with those requirements.
carried out by a lawful combatant. Equally simple are cases involving
Under this view, the key distinction appears to be that Milligan's activity could not be characterized as legal acts of hostility because Milligan was not a lawful combatant belonging to Confederate forces.
4 (providing basis for qualifying as lawful combatant); Aldrich, supra note 41, at 893 (explaining Al Qaeda as unlawful combatants); supra notes 99-100 and accompanying text (describing al-Awlaki's active involvement in terrorism plot).
In the United States some cases have shown that the interpretation of who is eligible to be a lawful combatant is strict.
But the fulcrum of unlawful combatancy is that the judicial proceedings may be conducted before regular domestic (civil or military) courts and, significantly, they may relate to acts other than those that divested the person of the status of lawful combatant. (95) Professor George Fletcher concurs, calling "the giant leap from the status of failing to qualify as a lawful combatant to the crime of being an unlawful combatant" in Quirin, "one of the greatest legal fallacies [he has] ever encountered." (96)
What is equally important in this equation, however, is that these factors apply only to combatants engaged in inter-state armed conflicts, effectively excluding from the lawful combatant status an individual fighting on behalf of an entity not affiliated with state authority.