lay reader

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lay reader

n.
A layperson in the Anglican or Roman Catholic church authorized by a bishop to read some parts of the service.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lay reader

n
1. (Anglicanism) Church of England a person licensed by a bishop to conduct religious services other than the Eucharist
2. (Roman Catholic Church) RC Church a layman chosen from among the congregation to read the epistle at Mass and sometimes other prayers
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

lay′ read`er


n.
a layperson authorized by an Anglican bishop to conduct parts of a service.
[1745–55]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lay reader - a layman who is authorized by the bishop to read parts of the service in an Anglican or Episcopal church
layman, layperson, secular - someone who is not a clergyman or a professional person
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
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