ley line

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ley line

(lā, lē)
n.
One of various supposed alignments of ancient monuments and prehistoric sites in straight lines, believed by some to indicate paths of positive energy inherent in the Earth.

[From ley (coined by Alfred Watkins (1855-1935), British antiquarian who suggested that ancient monuments and sites are arranged along a network of straight lines).]

ley line

A line, usually straight, joining two features in a landscape, thought to have been a prehistoric pathway or to have some kind of magical significance.
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References in periodicals archive ?
When people talk,' observes the psycholinguist Steven Pinker, 'they lay lines on each other, do a lot of role-playing, sidestep, shilly-shally, and engage in other forms of vagueness and innuendo.
Unloading six foot pieces of pipe off a truck to lay lines for
They explained that dowsing is not just used for finding water but also oil, buried architecture, lay lines and it was responsible for finding the Terracotta Warriors in Xian.
We had to lay lines probably a block away before we got a really good water supply,'' Deputy Chief Pinault said.
That kind of stuff belongs firmly in the same category as Dan Brown, crop circles, lay lines, Glastonbury zodiacs and most of the bunkum the Freemasons charge large sums of money to tell men only behind locked doors in windowless buildings.
However, as a replacement for the carding machine, these air lay lines also weren't perfect.
Some people got to help lay lines and others made general service calls.
Initially baffled, the paranormal investigators later found the house may have been built over lay lines.
Traversing forces are transferred from the linear actuator to a spool cartridge that then moves back and forth to ensure smooth, even take-up lay lines.
The Knight by the pool, volume I in Lay Lines medieval adult fantasy trilogy, Bantam, Transworld, November 1998