Le Chatelier's principle


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Le Chatelier's principle

(lə ʃæˈtɛljeɪz)
n
(Chemistry) chem the principle that if a system in chemical equilibrium is subjected to a disturbance it tends to change in a way that opposes this disturbance
[C19: named after H. L. Le Chatelier (1850–1936), French chemist]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Le Chatelier's principle - the principle that if any change is imposed on a system that is in equilibrium then the system tends to adjust to a new equilibrium counteracting the change
principle, rule - a rule or law concerning a natural phenomenon or the function of a complex system; "the principle of the conservation of mass"; "the principle of jet propulsion"; "the right-hand rule for inductive fields"
References in periodicals archive ?
The thermodynamic equilibrium of methane reforming reactions follows Le Chatelier's principle, so that low-pressure benefit reaction 1 and 3, whereas, reaction 2 is independent of pressure.
An Autoethnographic Lens as Method At Equilibrium: Kindergarten as an EL Disrupting Equilibrium Begins Interest-Convergence as an Interpretive Lens Conclusion References Author Contact Le Chatelier's principle of equilibrium states that if a change or stress is imposed on a system at equilibrium, the position of the equilibrium will shift in a direction that tends to reduce that change depending on the stress applied to the system (Last & Slade, 2007).
The three concepts chosen were Le Chatelier's Principle (and dynamic chemical equilibria more broadly), Intermolecular Forces (and other interparticle forces) and Thermochemistry.
as something that performs and responds more like a stressed ecosystem, something full of non-linear change." He wields analogies of sudden change throughout, but students of chemistry may remember Le Chatelier's principle: if a chemical system is changed (say, by increasing the temperature), the system responds so as to counteract the effect of the change (by absorbing heat).
According to Le Chatelier's principle, any phenomenon (such as phase transition, chemical reaction, etc.) accompanied by a decrease in volume is enhanced by pressure.