Le Fanu


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Le Fanu

(ˈlɛfənjuː)
n
(Biography) (Joseph) Sheridan. 1814–73, Irish writer, best known for his stories of mystery and the supernatural, esp Uncle Silas (1864) and the collection In a Glass Darkly (1872)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
But despite her duplicity, Lucy is greatly sanitized in comparison with the lesbian vampires who preceded her, such as Le Fanu's Carmilla, "one of the few self-accepting homosexuals in Victorian or any literature." Auerbach points out that Stoker "gentrified female vampires, who, for the first time, are monogamously heterosexual"; after her death, Lucy the flirt is purified into Lucy the wife." This is significant, but it also tells us that the only way to cure female promiscuity is to kill the woman or, the equivalent, marry her; and before her death, the bitten Lucy is hardly the image of the good little woman.
A picture by Dou's own pupil, Gottfried Schalcken, has been temporarily removed: one of his wraith-like maidens by candle-light who may have prompted Sheridan Le Fanu to write his weird tale, Schalcken the Painter.
I suspect that this passage is the source of Le Fanu's allusion.
James le Fanu of London, there's nothing wrong with "discriminating against those [patients] with the least chances of survival in favor of those with the best." And in the case of bypass surgery, says John Bailey, a cardiac surgeon in Leicester, England, smokers "have more infections, longer hospital stays, and are more likely to require a second operation, which is not only risky but costly."
Hardy, Robert Louis Stevenson, Lovecraft, Hawthorne, and Le Fanu contribute regularly to the same, gift-wrapped compendia.
Varney the Vampire, or The Feast of Blood (authorship is disputed; either John Malcolm Rymer or Thomas Peckett Prest), a long novel, appeared in 1847 Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu's redoubtable "Carmilla" first saw print in 1871; but it was Stoker's Dracula, published in 1897, that surpassed them all and remains the paragon of vampire stories even today.
In the following six chapters, Hepp includes John Polidori's The Vampyre (1816), Ernst Bejamin Raupach's Lafit die Todten ruh'n (1823), James Rymer and Thomas Peckett Prest's Varney, the Vampire; or, the Feast of the Blood (1847), The Mysterious Stranger (anonymous, 1860), Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu's Carmilla (1872), and Bram Stoker's Dracula (1897) in his tour of nineteenth-century liminal vampires.
The Irish Vampire: From Folklore to the Imaginations of Charles Robert Maturin, Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu, and Bram Stoker
He joined the civil service but his love of theatre led him to write as an unpaid critic for the Dublin Evening Mail, co-owned by the gothic writer Sheridan Le Fanu.
El jefe de la Asociacion Aborigenista Argentina--atencion, no focalizada en el gaucho del Centenario--, Tonio Le Fanu, no obstante su nombre francoitaliano, es un aleman que llega de ese pais durante la Segunda Guerra Mundial.
Sheridan Le Fanu's Carmilla, Robert Louis Stevenson's The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, and finally Wilde's Dorian Gray.