tartuffe

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tar·tuffe

also tar·tufe  (tär-to͝of′, -to͞of′)
n.
A hypocrite, especially one who affects religious piety.

[After the protagonist of Tartuffe, , a play by Molière.]

tar·tuf′fe·ry n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Tartuffe

(tɑːˈtʊf; -ˈtuːf) or

Tartufe

n
a person who hypocritically pretends to be deeply pious
[from the character in the Molière's comedy Tartuffe (1664)]
Tarˈtuffian, Tarˈtufian adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Tar•tuffe

or Tar•tufe

(tɑrˈtʊf, -ˈtuf)

n.
(often l.c.) a hypocritical pretender to piety.
[after the title character in a Molière play (1664)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Tartuffe - a hypocrite who pretends to religious piety (after the protagonist in a play by Moliere)
dissembler, dissimulator, hypocrite, phoney, phony, pretender - a person who professes beliefs and opinions that he or she does not hold in order to conceal his or her real feelings or motives
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

tartuffe

also tartufe
noun
A person who practices hypocrisy:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Herzel, "The Decor of Moliere's Stage: The Testimony of Brissart and Chauveau," PMLA 93 (1978): 925-54; Francoise Siguret, "L'Image ou l'Imposture: Analyse d'une Gravure Illustrant Le Tartuffe," Revue d'Histoire du Theatre 36 (1984): 362-70; Stephen Varick Dock, Costume and Fashion in the Plays of Jean-Baptiste Poquelin Moliere: A Seventeenth-Century Perspective (Geneva: Slatkine, 1992); Michael Hawcroft, "Seventeenth-Century French Theatre and its Illustrations: Five Types of Discontinuity" Seventeenth-Century French Studies 24 (2002): 87-105.
Born Jean-Baptiste Poquelin, the son of a Parisianmerchant in 1622, Moliere also wrote the classic religious satire Le Tartuffe. He died after being taken ill during a stage performance in 1673.
These three volumes, each concerned with Le Tartuffe, demonstrate a great variety of approaches--and, in the process, the vitality of the play itself.