Le Chatelier's principle

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Le Chatelier's principle

(lə ʃæˈtɛljeɪz)
n
(Chemistry) chem the principle that if a system in chemical equilibrium is subjected to a disturbance it tends to change in a way that opposes this disturbance
[C19: named after H. L. Le Chatelier (1850–1936), French chemist]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Le Chatelier's principle - the principle that if any change is imposed on a system that is in equilibrium then the system tends to adjust to a new equilibrium counteracting the change
principle, rule - a rule or law concerning a natural phenomenon or the function of a complex system; "the principle of the conservation of mass"; "the principle of jet propulsion"; "the right-hand rule for inductive fields"
References in periodicals archive ?
The intuition that constrained choices are less elastic as well as suboptimal is confirmed by LeChatelier's principle in economic models of optimizing behavior for environments with no uncertainty.
The enterpreneur's demand for labor, however, does not necessarily display LeChatelier's principle in response to increases in the wage rate.
Thus, away from long-run equilibria, competitive entrepreneurial firms may not evince LeChatelier's principle.