League of Nations


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League of Nations

A world organization established in 1920 to promote international cooperation and peace. It was first proposed in 1918 by President Woodrow Wilson, although the United States never joined the League. Essentially powerless, it was dissolved in 1946.

League of Nations

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) an international association of states founded in 1920 with the aim of preserving world peace: dissolved in 1946
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Noun1.League of Nations - an international organization formed in 1920 to promote cooperation and peace among nations; although suggested by Woodrow Wilson, the United States never joined and it remained powerless; it was dissolved in 1946 after the United Nations was formed
References in periodicals archive ?
project, the entire content of the League of Nations (LoN) Archives, approximately 15 M pages of
Republic of Paradox: League of Nations Minority Protection Regime and the New Turkey Step-Citizens", International Journal of Middle East Studies, Cilt 46, Ozel Sayi (World War I), No.
While Wilson was fashioning such a body at the postwar peace talks in Paris, opposition to the League of Nations was swirling within the Republican Party, particularly among Senate Republicans who would consider ratification of the Treaty of Versailles.
Let's make it a League of Nations, have promotion and relegation, the lot.
1) His words echoed those of Eduard Bene, president of the sixteenth assembly of the League of Nations, who claimed half a century earlier that "the League of Nations was the expression of a general democratization of the postwar world and an organ of international democracy.
Townshend quotes the promise that the British made in 1920 to the League of Nations, "Should Iraq prove herself unworthy of the confidence which has been placed in her, the moral responsibility must rest with His Majesty's Government," and ends his book, saying, "It still does" (526).
Which major country refused to participate in the League of Nations, set up after the First World War?
Drawn from the author's doctoral dissertation, this work on New Zealand's foreign policy in the wake of World War I examines the nation's growing independence from the imperial policy and outlines how relationships within the League of Nations led to an expanded international world view for New Zealand's diplomats and policy makers.
It is frightening to recall that economic crisis and failure of the League of Nations was the cause of the Second World War and history repeats itself
Successive Israeli governments have failed to recognize the supreme importance of the "Mandate for Palestine" [24 July, 1922] a historical League of Nations document that set forth the irrevocable Jewish legal rights to settle anywhere in western Palestine, the area between the Jordan River and the Mediterranean Sea, an entitlement unaltered by international law and valid to this day.
I was in the Second World War for five years and fought for British people, not the League of Nations.
Under a League of Nations mandate of 1920 the Saar region was to be governed for 15 years by a commission appointed by the League, while control of the coal mines was given to the French, who pocketed the proceeds as part of their reparations.

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