neurolinguistics

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neurolinguistics

(ˌnjʊərəʊlɪŋˈɡwɪstɪks)
n
(Linguistics) (functioning as singular) the branch of linguistics that deals with the encoding of the language faculty in the brain
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Noun1.neurolinguistics - the branch of linguistics that studies the relation between language and the structure and function of the nervous system
linguistics - the scientific study of language
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References in periodicals archive ?
Belief system of learners is firm set of thoughts and attitudes about learning language, effective teaching strategies, and appropriate classroom behavior.
He highlighted the rationality in learning language for seeking due place in the society.
Children need opportunities for learning language through play with peers.
Overall results show that there is no significant difference between the mean scores of the students on cognitive strategies of learning language.
He added: "This is likely because these children are better able to capitalize on their peers' skills for learning language.
The first four years of schooling are vital to one's development in learning language and literacy skills.
Grammar Wars: 179 Games and Improvs for Learning Language Arts" is a book of games and activities to that will entertain children as well as educate them about the rules and eccentricities of grammar, alongside other essential language arts skills.
The new findings, slated to appear in an upcoming Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, support the view that learning language doesn't hinge solely on the ability to imitate spoken sounds.
The authors present a framework of best practices for teachers of foreign language literature that attempt to mirror the process of learning language via reading for pleasure, and also draw on techniques used in native language literature courses when the text is challenging.
The importance of children learning language through opportunities to play with their peers is emphasized throughout this book.
However, equivalence concepts may represent a prerequisite for learning language, he argues.
They are also learning language and social skills before they start school that just a generation ago would have seemed very advanced.

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