pompano

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pom·pa·no

 (pŏm′pə-nō′)
n. pl. pompano or pom·pa·nos
1. Any of several marine carangid food fishes chiefly of the genus Trachinotus, especially T. carolinus of western Atlantic waters, having a silvery oblong body with a bluish back.
2. A butterfish (Peprilus simillimus) of Pacific coastal waters of North America.

[American Spanish pámpano, any of several kinds of fish, from Spanish, vine tendril, a kind of fish with golden markings, from Latin pampinus, vine tendril.]

pompano

(ˈpɒmpəˌnəʊ)
n, pl -no or -nos
1. (Animals) any of several deep-bodied carangid food fishes of the genus Trachinotus, esp T. carolinus, of American coastal regions of the Atlantic
2. (Animals) a spiny-finned food fish, Palometa simillima, of North American coastal regions of the Pacific: family Stromateidae (butterfish, etc)
[C19: from Spanish pámpano type of fish, of uncertain origin]

pom•pa•no

(ˈpɒm pəˌnoʊ)

n., pl. (esp. collectively) -no, (esp. for kinds or species) -nos.
1. a deep-bodied food fish, Trachinotus carolinus, inhabiting waters off the S Atlantic and Gulf states.
2. a food fish, Preprilus simillimus, of California.
[1770–80; < Sp pámpano kind of fish]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pompano - flesh of pompanopompano - flesh of pompano; warm-water fatty fish
pompano - any of several deep-bodied food fishes of western Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico
saltwater fish - flesh of fish from the sea used as food
2.pompano - any of several deep-bodied food fishes of western Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico
carangid, carangid fish - a percoid fish of the family Carangidae
genus Trachinotus, Trachinotus - a genus of Carangidae
Florida pompano, Trachinotus carolinus - found in coastal waters New England to Brazil except clear waters of West Indies
Trachinotus falcatus, permit - large game fish; found in waters of the West Indies
pompano - flesh of pompano; warm-water fatty fish
References in periodicals archive ?
He cast his eye over the plain leather jack and workmanlike breeches and boots Nick had chosen to wear, and shook his head.
Nick leaned further back in his corner, peeling his leather jack away from the jerkin of the soldier behind him who was using him as a leaning-post, becoming aware of the ache in his thighs from the long ride.
Schools of leather jacks, herring, glass minnows and menhaden are commonly here.