Leavis

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Leavis

(ˈliːvɪs)
n
(Biography) F(rank) R(aymond). 1895–1978, English literary critic. He edited Scrutiny (1932–53) and his books include The Great Tradition (1948) and The Common Pursuit (1952)
ˈLeavisˌite adj, n
References in periodicals archive ?
Such nostalgia was paramount when journalists, critics and actors attacked the RSC's new business discourse in 1996 when Chris Foy and Lord Alexander, the latter a former chairman of National Westminster Bank, became board members and their business "jargon" in new contracts transformed the RSC's dream of a Leavisite "cottage industry" into a "multinational conglomerate" (Trowbridge 2013, 134).
The Leavisite project of ethical formation through literature is scarcely revivable in sheerly secular terms, since these now deny the reality of soul and spirit upon which every humanism depends, while the dominance of the scientific and research-based model of the university manifests itself in terms of the managerialist organisation of the entertainment-producing departments.
A discussion followed, informed by Leavisite analysis of the presented work.
with the 'threatened writer' who wants to defend Leavisite
Eliot into the Leavisite school of Literary Criticism.
David Ellis, Memoirs of a Leavisite. Liverpool: Liverpool UP., 2013.h/bk 151 pp.ISBN 978-0-84631-889-4
If, unlike Ross and his colleagues, Amis finds little liberating potential in consumerism and mass culture, still, Self's conflicting alliances with Martina/Martin Amis and Selina/Fielding do not comprise a Leavisite fable about culture's capacity to stave off the corrosive addiction of consumerism.
Leavis were showing how to read literary and mass culture texts with an eye on the values and historical forms of life expressed through them, a tradition from which Raymond Williams would emerge, bending aspects of the Leavisite project into a Marxian analysis of culture and society (1958; see also Dworkin, 1997).
Certainly these texts cannot be understood or rendered valuable in Leavisite terms that privileged densely symbolic highbrow literature or in the nationalist terms that would later dominate university literature courses in Canada.
It had on the one hand the inheritance of the Leavisite literary criticism it was trying to escape from, and on the other the crude Marxism it had rejected.
The literary press in Britain has eagerly taken up the Leavisite slack, moonlighting as the moral advocate of the self-consciously middlebrow.
There is no trace of Leavisite pickiness in his choice of examples as he also invites us to think about and then enjoy some splendidly uncanonical works like chapbooks, the Russian lubki and modern Japanese manga.