Leibniz


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Leib·niz

or Leib·nitz  (līb′nĭts, līp′-), Baron Gottfried Wilhelm von 1646-1716.
German philosopher and mathematician. He invented differential and integral calculus independently of Newton and proposed an optimist metaphysical theory that included the notion that we live in "the best of all possible worlds."

Leib•niz

or Leib•nitz

(ˈlaɪb nɪts, ˈlaɪp-)

n.
Gottfried Wilhelm von, 1646–1716, German philosopher and mathematician.
Leib•niz′i•an, Leib•nitz′i•an, adj., n.
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Noun1.Leibniz - German philosopher and mathematician who thought of the universe as consisting of independent monads and who devised a system of the calculus independent of Newton (1646-1716)Leibniz - German philosopher and mathematician who thought of the universe as consisting of independent monads and who devised a system of the calculus independent of Newton (1646-1716)
References in classic literature ?
Thus, although it may be difficult to determine what exactly is sensation in any given experience, it is clear that there is sensation, unless, like Leibniz, we deny all action of the outer world upon us.
Such detours go back to the substantial conceit of Erlich Sachs's book, as The Organs of Sense stages a fictional encounter between the philosopher Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, portrayed at the age of nineteen, and a mysterious, blind astronomer, both anticipating an eclipse predicted by the latter to take place at noon, June 30, 1666.
Monads, Composition, and Force: Ariadnean Threads through Leibniz's Labyrinth.
Summary: New Delhi [India], July 1 (ANI): Google is celebrating the 372nd birthday of German philosopher Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz with a doodle.
(3) This paper contends that Blake's critique and emendation of John Locke's atomistic empiricism in those tractates, particularly in There is No Natural Religion (1788), bear striking similarities to Gottfried Leibniz's criticisms of Locke, as articulated in his New Essays on Human Understanding (1765), and the ontology Leibniz presents as a corrective to Locke's Newtonian metaphysics.