Dionysus

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Di·o·ny·sus

 (dī′ə-nī′səs, -nē′-)
n. Greek & Roman Mythology
The god of wine and of an orgiastic religion celebrating the power and fertility of nature. Also called Bacchus.

[Latin Dionȳsus, from Greek Dionūsos.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Dionysus

(ˌdaɪəˈnaɪsəs) or

Dionysos

n
(Classical Myth & Legend) the Greek god of wine, fruitfulness, and vegetation, worshipped in orgiastic rites. He was also known as the bestower of ecstasy and god of the drama, and identified with Bacchus
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Di•o•ny•sus

or Di•o•ny•sos

(ˌdaɪ əˈnaɪ səs)

n.
an ancient Greek and Roman fertility god, associated esp. with the vine and wine.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Dionysus - (Greek mythology) god of wine and fertility and dramaDionysus - (Greek mythology) god of wine and fertility and drama; the Greek name of Bacchus
Greek mythology - the mythology of the ancient Greeks
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Dionysus

nDionysos m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
On the positive side, he has included some texts not included by Morel or Buechner: the epigraphic epigram of Loreius Tiburtinus (although the more fragmentary texts from the same wall are omitted), the poem of Pompeius Lenaeus, the epigrams attributed to Virgil, the verse fragments of Varro's Hebdomades, and the more coherent portions of the Carmen de Bello Actiaco.
From other sources we learn that two grammatici, Servius Nicanor and Pompeius Lenaeus, wrote saturae (Suet.