lenticel

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len·ti·cel

 (lĕn′tĭ-sĕl′)
n.
One of the small, corky, oval or elongated areas on the surface of a plant stem, trunk, or fruit that allow the interchange of gases between the interior tissue and the surrounding air.

[New Latin lenticella, diminutive of lēns, lent-, lens; see lens.]

len′ti·cel′late (-sĕl′ĭt) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lenticel

(ˈlɛntɪˌsɛl)
n
(Botany) any of numerous pores in the stem of a woody plant allowing exchange of gases between the plant and the exterior
[C19: from New Latin lenticella, from Latin lenticula diminutive of lēns lentil]
lenticellate adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

len•ti•cel

(ˈlɛn təˌsɛl)

n.
a corky slash or spot appearing on plant bark, above the epidermal stoma, that allows for the exchange of gases between the atmosphere and inner tissue.
[1850–55; < New Latin lenticella, diminutive of Latin lenticula lentil =lenti-, s. of lēns (see lens) + -cula -cle1]
len`ti•cel′late (-ɪt) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lenticel - one of many raised pores on the stems of woody plants that allow the interchange of gas between the atmosphere and the interior tissue
stoma, stomate, pore - a minute epidermal pore in a leaf or stem through which gases and water vapor can pass
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The peel should be perfect until reaching the final consumer, which is the biggest challenge in the export of this fruit, since it is fragile and in the lenticels usually shelter spores of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides Penz, causal agent of anthracnose as well as other pathogens.
Tree pyramidal, 8-12 m; branches slightly angular, purple-dark brown lenticels, glabrous; young branches outside wavy with fairly long soft straight hairs except glabrous.
Except for an occasional interruption of warty lenticels, the bark of Nanking cherry shines as if it has been buffed daily with a shoeshine cloth.
It has been suggested that Trichoderma penetrates the stem through the thin periderm, lenticels, leaf scars or scars of bud scales (Baum et al, 2003; Ouellette et al, 1995; Stone, 1987) and also stem trichomes (Bailey et al., 2009).
Most fungal pathogens infect fruit from wounds, stomata, and lenticels through spore germination to form germ tubes, causing postharvest diseases [8, 21].
"If you look very closely at the prop roots, you can see blister-like spots called lenticels (3) that allow the roots to breathe air while the roots are flooded by the tides.
Sclereids and lenticels occur more frequently in virgin cork than in second cork (Zhao 2012), which is from the newly produced phellem layer.
Oval-shaped lenticels (34.29[+ or -] 0.26 [micro]m) were observed arranged in parallel on the abaxial midrib of the leaf (Figure 4).
The orebodies usually occur as sheets, lenticels, sacs, lentils, and irregular veins, and these generally propagate along interlayer fractures.