Leo X


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Leo X

Originally Giovanni de Medici. 1475-1521.
Pope (1513-1521) who concluded a concordat with France (1516) and excommunicated Martin Luther (1521).
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Leo X

n
(Biography) original name Giovanni de' Medici. 1475–1521, pope (1513–21): noted for his patronage of Renaissance art and learning; excommunicated Luther (1521)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Leo X - son of Lorenzo de'Medici and pope from 1513 to 1521 who excommunicated Martin Luther and who in 1521 bestowed on Henry VIII the title of Defender of the Faith (1475-1521)Leo X - son of Lorenzo de'Medici and pope from 1513 to 1521 who excommunicated Martin Luther and who in 1521 bestowed on Henry VIII the title of Defender of the Faith (1475-1521)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
A sign of how important the mordant was to the church's finances is a provision of Pope Leo X's sweeping indulgence of 1517--the one that set off Martin Luther.
The Prado's magnificent exhibition provided a unique opportunity to explore the last seven years of Raphael's life, taking Leo X's proclamation as Pope in 1513 as its starting point, and ending with the artist's death aged 37.
This was made all the more feasible with the election of Giovanni de' Medici, taking the name Leo X, to the papal throne.
When Luther nailed his famous 'Ninety-Five Theses' (attacking the sale of 'indulgences' to forgive sins) to the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg on October 31st, 1517 and, three years later, publicly burnt Pope Leo X's papal bull condemning him, Cranach was steadfast in his support.
En passant, we are also treated to a wonderful array of unexpected bits of information and discussions from Pope Leo X's near dissolution of the Conventual Franciscans in 1517, humanist maledictions of the dead, and debates on female spirituality to Saint Antoninus's condemnation of sailors as homines pessimi, blasphematores, discussions of the morality of fleeing or remaining during plagues, and comments on Angelo Poliziano's interest in the Psalter, just to give a tiny sampling from an encyclopedic collection of data and analyses.
But of this, and, indeed, of the Councils of Lyons, Vienne, Pisa, Constance, Basel-Ferrara-Florence, we hear nothing--even though a full chapter is devoted to Lateran V, which at the time of Trent the French delegation was still loathe to recognize as a legitimate general council and which Dollinger was later to deride as Leo X's "italienisches Taschenkonzils." All of this despite the fact that those late medieval councils had not only identified so many of the abuses that were later to be addressed by Trent's disciplinary reforms but had also made an historic attempt to grapple with the most pressing ecclesiological issue of the day, one that the worried papal legates at Trent were finally forced to put on hold.
In this regard, incidentally, it is surprising that the editors chose to exclude the oldest love song in Yiddish, a brief but quite charming lyric, which exists uniquely on the front leaf of a fourteenth-century (primarily parchment) manuscript of Rashi's commentaries on the Prophets and Hagiography, originally in the collection of Pope Leo X's secretary, Pietro Bembo (now Milan, Biblioteca Ambrosiana, C.
a comparison between Castiglione's Book of the courtier and the La cortigiana, the presentation of Cortigiana as a virtual tribute to Pasquino and his pasquinate, an analysis of how Aretinos comedy is a mirror of Leo x's papal court, and a bibliography of primary and secondary-sources.
Campbell), Sforza Milan (Luke Syson), Margaret of Austria (Ethan Matt Kavaler), Raphael in Leo X's Rome (Kim E.
For twelve years, beginning in 1984, the group portrait Leo X with Cardinals Giulio de' Medici and Luigi de' Rossi (fig.
Randolph's analysis of Pope Leo X's use of leonine imagery (11-18) to Mary-Ann Winkelmes' thoughts on the acoustics of Renaissance churches (307-12).
Peter as Leo X. Leo was quick to establish strong diplomatic ties with his native city.