Leopold III


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Leopold III

n
(Biography) 1901–83, king of the Belgians (1934–51); son of Albert I. His surrender to the Nazis (1940) forced his eventual abdication in favour of his son, Baudouin
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1114, Austrian nobleman Leopold III, who married a daughter of German Emperor Henry IV, founded the monastery.
Bush, Jermone Lejeune, King Leopold III, Queen Astrid of Belgium, Franz Jagerstatter, George Washington Carver, Rose Hawthorne and many others.
The earliest reports of Basel's Fasnacht, which begins each year on the Monday following Ash Wednesday, date from 1376 when Duke Leopold III, the lord of the city, held a tournament on Munsterplatz, after which a tumult broke out during which four noblemen were killed and twelve burghers beheaded for their impulsive act.
His thoughts turn to his unhappy childhood during World War II, when Belgium was overcome by the Nazis and King Leopold III went into self-imposed exile.
1 The Iranian oil industry was nationalised 2 Labour Minister Aneurin Bevan resigned from the government 3 Ivor Novello and Ernest Bevin died 4 King Leopold III of the Belgians abdicated impossipuzzles Jenson took a deep breath.
EVENTS 1950: The Belgian government collapses over a referendum on the return from exile of King Leopold III.
These pupils are the real success story, just as in Belgium the real success stories are not King Leopold III, Audrey Hepburn or Jean Claude Van Dame (I'm starting to struggle here) but the millions of Walloons and Flemings who have managed to co-exist for years without resorting to civil warfare.
1950 - King Leopold III returns to Belgium after six years in exile, but abdicates in August.
WHO WHAT WHERE WHEN: King Leopold III; A watermark; Essex; 1970.
Two days later the battalion took up positions which they had previously occupied and it was here that they received the news which shook the world - that without regard for the Allies King Leopold III had ordered the Belgian Army of 200,000 to lay down their arms, thus leaving a gap through which the German army poured.