letterboxing

(redirected from Letterboxer)

let·ter·box

 (lĕt′ər-bŏks′)
n.
1. See mailbox.
2. A format for presenting movies on television that maintains the rectangular theater image on a television screen by reducing the overall image until the full width can be seen, resulting in blank space above and below the image.
tr.v. let·ter·box·es, let·ter·box·ing, let·ter·boxed
To produce or present (film) in a letterbox format.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

letterboxing

(ˈlɛtəˌbɒksɪŋ)
n
1. (Film) a method of formatting film that enables all of a wide-screen film to be transmitted on a television screen, resulting in a blank strip of screen above and below the picture
2. (Other Non-sporting Hobbies) a type of treasure hunt in which a box, known as a letterbox, is hidden in a remote rural location and clues are provided as to its whereabouts
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Letterboxer users were using Atlasquest, a website where clues are posted, to find the family who'd stamped in on July 30.
Rauscher Farm's hidden letterboxes with their secret treasures are the creative work of Melissa Misiewicz and Kim Covey, two experienced letterboxers. Assisted by Stowell, Misiewicz and Covey, designed the farm's letterboxing adventure with distinctive "critter'' stamps that introduce youngsters to the natural world they can find on Rauscher Farm.Within weeks of the Rauscher Farm letterboxing series going "live'' in July, letterboxers gave Rauscher Farm boxes the week's highest rating nationally.
Letterboxers should bring their signature stamps, ink, and logbooks.
Unlike geocachers, who rely on a GPS unit, letterboxers use a compass to follow their clues.
She doesn't think any other letterboxers will catch up to her total any time soon.
While geocaching has grown popular, letterboxers seem to prefer the mostly technology-free searches of their hobby.