lettrism

(redirected from Lettrist)

lettrism

a technique of poetic composition originated by Isidore Isou, characterized by strange or meaningless arrangements of letters.
See also: Verse
References in periodicals archive ?
Antonio Gramsci, the Italian belle lettrist, whose highly original musings on political theory, linguistics and neo-Marxist thought continue to dazzle readers decades after they were penned - in prison, no less, where died in 1937 at the age of 46 - insisted that intellectuals should be active in the struggle against injustice, wherever injustice is found, for by not doing so they effectively give their approval to the prevailing order.
There are even earlier artistic uses of the teleprinter to be found, such as French lettrist Isidore Isou's "telescripteur" from the early 1960s (Bandini, 2003).
Sj|berg teases out the influences of Judaism and Jewish culture on the work of Romanian Jewish poet and visual artist Isidore Isou (1925-2007), who founded the avant-garde lettrist movement during the 1940s.
1) Here, lettrist cinema, foundational to the Situationist art movement, invents action instead of image.
In his hands, language became a kind of bebop zaum or lettrist poetry that's as likely to be nonsense as it is to be incantation.
And then he passed along his enthusiasm to second-generation Belgian Surrealists like Dotremont and Marien who in turn influenced Guy Debord and Gil Wolman's Situationist concept of detournement; Debord, who knew Dotremont through the COBRA and Lettrist International groups in Paris, visited Brussels in the fall of 1952 and met Nouge, Scutenaire, and others.
Beyond the Black Box: The Lettrist Cinema of Disjunction.
These begin prior to the formation of the SI with the Lettrist International and its reading of the city as informed by interwar Surrealism's insistence on passion and desire.
The practice of derive, or "drifting"--which originated with the Lettrist International figure Ivan Chtcheglov and later developed by Situationist guru Guy Debord--was initially intended as an antidote to normative forces in modern society, encouraging people to explore their own environment without preconceptions.
Such a pertinence of the signifier indeed makes it possible to oppose poetry to prose (this is how Souriau answers the question I am asking in these pages [158]), but to all appearances it plays only a rather marginal role in relation to literature as a whole: the dadaists' Lautdichtung, the futurists' neologisms, lettrist or concrete poetry.
In "Remaking the Remake: Irma Vep" Paul Sutton suggests a different reading of Vidal's cut of Les Vampires: "[Vidal's] avant-garde `scratch' film, reminiscent of the Lettrist films of Isidore Isou, productively remakes Feuillade's 'original' as a film that is arguably about spectatorship and the structure of the look in film" (71).
photographs and excerpts of Lettrist writing that appear in the margins