carnitine

(redirected from Levocarnitine)
Also found in: Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to Levocarnitine: L-carnitine

car·ni·tine

 (kär′nĭ-tēn′)
n.
A compound that functions in fatty acid metabolism by transporting fatty acids into mitochondria for energy production. It is naturally produced in the body and is present in many animal products, especially red meat. It is also sold as a dietary supplement for its purported health benefits.

[German Karnitin, from Karnin, a basic substance derived from meat, from Latin carō, carn-, flesh; see carnal.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

carnitine

(ˈkɑːnɪˌtaɪn)
n
a white betaine, C7H15NO3, found in the liver and required for transporting fatty acids from the cytosol into the mitochondria
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

carnitine

n carnitina
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Effect of levocarnitine on TIMP-1, ICAM-1 expression of rats with coronary heart disease and its myocardial protection effect.
For instance, growth promotion in tilapias was reported in concentrations that ranged from 150 to 900 mg of levocarnitine per kg of diet (Jayaprakas et al., 1996; Becker et al., 1999).
Treatment of L2HGA is under investigation; case reports have described positive effects of FAD sodium in combination with levocarnitine chloride in one patient (10) and riboflavin, a precursor of FAD, in another patient (11).
Kong et al., "Levocarnitine protects H9c2 rat cardiomyocytes from [H.sub.2][O.sub.2]-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis," International Journal of Medical Sciences, vol.
(2003) Levocarnitine administration in elderly subjects with rapid muscle fatigue: effect on body composition, lipid profile and fatigue.
High-flux hemodialysis and levocarnitine in the treatment of severe valproic Acid intoxication.
Administration of levocarnitine and/or branched chain amino acids during invasive treatments reduced blood ammonia (NH3) concentration and suppressed the albumen.10 HCCa is reported to be the second most common cause of non-islet cell tumour hypoglycaemia (NICTH) which was controlled by using systemic chemotherapy.11 This type of cancer occurs more often in men than women and is usually seen in people with age of 50 or older.12 However, age varies in different parts of the world.
In addition to milk power containing medium-chain fatty acid, medical treatment with levocarnitine oral solution was given.
Davis et al., "A prospective double-blind, randomized clinical trial of levocarnitine to treat autism spectrum disorders," Medical Science Monitor, vol.
The following medical subject headings were used: "L-carnitine," "carnitine," "levocarnitine," "novain," "L-cthernitine," "Vitamin BT," "Bicarnesine," "heart failure," "cardiac dysfunction," "cardiac insufficiency," "cardiac inadequacy," "cardiomyopathy," and "ventricular dysfunction." Electronic searches were supplemented with manual searches of reference lists of all retrieved review articles, primary studies, and abstracts from meetings to identify other studies not found in the electronic searches.
Non-labeled use includes macrolide antibiotics prostaglandins a-TocopherolGingko biloba garlic propionyl levocarnitine chelation therapy (EDTA) hyperbaric oxygen and cinnarazine27-29.