Lewis gun

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Lewis gun

n
(Firearms, Gunnery, Ordnance & Artillery) a light air-cooled drum-fed gas-operated machine gun used chiefly in World War I
[C20: named after I. N. Lewis (1858–1931), US soldier]
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"Two of them were shot down and despite being shot in the thigh and temporarily losing control of the plane, he gave chase, emptied his Lewis machine gun on his targets and flew home after causing major damage."
Lance Cpl Harry Field, of 8 Sufton Street, was serving with the Lewis machine gun section.
Among the several other additions is the Lewis Machine Gun made by British Small Arms used in the two world wars.
It was shot down by small arms and Lewis machine gun fire while on a lone-wolf mission to attack the Birmetals factory, in Woodgate, on the same night Rudolf Hess landed in Scotland.
The items included will showcase the vast breadth of the Birmingham manufacturing sector including the Mini Minor, the Smethwick engine made by Boulton & Watt, a First World War Lewis machine gun made by BSA, decorative glass exported to India in the 19th century made by F & C Osler and iconic Bird's custard.
Located at Fulford Heath, this particular searchlight crew had just rifles and one Lewis machine gun with which to fire at the Heinkel bomber.
But Major General Leonard Wood declared, "In my private opinion, the Lewis Machine Gun is the best light-type gun yet developed for troops in the field." By 1917, 40,000 Lewis Guns were in service with the British, French, Italian and Russian armies.
Leonard Wood declared, "In my private opinion, the Lewis Machine Gun is the best light-type gun yet developed for troops in the field." By 1917,40,000 Lewis guns were in service with the British, French, Italian and Russian armies.
In their "Curio and Relics" section was listed one of the very famous 7.92mm Kurz caliber German MP44s also know as the "Sturmgewehr." That's not all: OOW also had in stock a Lewis Machine Gun. But this wasn't just any Lewis Gun.
Maurice Kirk - a plane enthusiast known as the Flying Vet - advertised the working Lewis machine gun for sale for pounds 2,000.
Eighteen-year-old Private Harry Patch - a plumber - had gone into action with the 7th Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry, one of five men working a Lewis machine gun. I took him back to his battlefield two years ago, when he was still sprightly enough to make the journey.