natural law

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Related to Lex naturalis: Jus naturale, natural law

natural law

n.
A body of moral and ethical principles that are considered to be inherent in nature itself or deducible through reason alone, often contrasted with positive law.

natural law

n
1. (Philosophy) an ethical belief or system of beliefs supposed to be inherent in human nature and discoverable by reason rather than revelation
2. (Philosophy) a nonlogically necessary truth; law of nature. See also nomological2
3. (Philosophy) the philosophical doctrine that the authority of the legal system or of certain laws derives from their justifiability by reason, and indeed that a legal system which cannot be so justified has no authority

nat′ural law′


n.
a principle or body of laws considered as derived from nature, right reason, or religion and as ethically binding in human society.
[1350–1400]

natural law

The body of law that is believed to be inherent in human nature.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.natural law - a rule or body of rules of conduct inherent in human nature and essential to or binding upon human society
concept, conception, construct - an abstract or general idea inferred or derived from specific instances
divine law - a law that is believed to come directly from God
principle - a basic truth or law or assumption; "the principles of democracy"
sound law - a law describing sound changes in the history of a language
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Lex naturalis, neither a Christian nor other religion's idea, is mainly based on synderese, which is the innate ability of the human brain to learn the first principles of ethics: "do good, avoid evil.
See generally ERIC ENGLE, LEX NATURALIS, IUS NATURALIS: LAW
37) Second, they criticize the conception of practical reason advanced in Natural Law and Practical Reason and in Praktische Vernunft und Vernunftigkeit der Praxis for its claim that "the concrete judgments of prudence would be derived from the principles of the lex naturalis in an infallible manner and without any recourse to experience.