natural law

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Related to Lex naturalis: Jus naturale, natural law

natural law

n.
A body of moral and ethical principles that are considered to be inherent in nature itself or deducible through reason alone, often contrasted with positive law.

natural law

n
1. (Philosophy) an ethical belief or system of beliefs supposed to be inherent in human nature and discoverable by reason rather than revelation
2. (Philosophy) a nonlogically necessary truth; law of nature. See also nomological2
3. (Philosophy) the philosophical doctrine that the authority of the legal system or of certain laws derives from their justifiability by reason, and indeed that a legal system which cannot be so justified has no authority

nat′ural law′


n.
a principle or body of laws considered as derived from nature, right reason, or religion and as ethically binding in human society.
[1350–1400]

natural law

The body of law that is believed to be inherent in human nature.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.natural law - a rule or body of rules of conduct inherent in human nature and essential to or binding upon human society
concept, conception, construct - an abstract or general idea inferred or derived from specific instances
divine law - a law that is believed to come directly from God
principle - a basic truth or law or assumption; "the principles of democracy"
sound law - a law describing sound changes in the history of a language
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Furthermore, sometimes the term lex naturalis is used as an equivalent of jus naturale--although Hobbes correctly makes the point of distinguishing lex from jus, referring to the former as "precepts" or "dictates of reason," and using the latter as right in the subjective sense (jus naturale).
Quite simply, the lex naturalis was of much greater concern to both early and late reformers than writers such as Stanley Hauerwas, Reinhold Niebuhr, and Helmut Thielicke would have us believe.
Briefly, there was the separation of the lex aeterna and the lex naturalis in a way the natura normativa was understood either in voluntarist terms by nominalism, or in rationalist terms by baroque Scholasticism (Gabriel Vasquez) and Stoicism (Pufendorf).