Liberal Unionist


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Liberal Unionist

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a Liberal who opposed Gladstone's policy of Irish Home Rule in 1886 and after
Liberal Unionism n
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
It is time we saw the Conservative Unionist that Davidson claims to be, not the Liberal Unionist she resembles, writes Brian Monteith.
Kemp was a wealthy man - at the time he built Lingholm he was Liberal Unionist MP for Heywood and had played first class cricket for Lancashire, being an accomplished batsman.
He became Liberal Unionist MP for Birmingham Ladywood in 1918.
The main institutions of this order - the church, education, law, local government and the media - were all part of what could be broadly characterised as a liberal unionist establishment.
Reginald Bevins JOHN Charles Bigham, 1st Viscount Mersey (August 3, 1840 - 3 September 3, 1929) THE Liberal Unionist MP for Liverpool Exchange - 1895-1897 - was also a John Charles |Bigham lawyer and, later, judge.
Under the banner 'Joseph Chamberlain: Imperial Standard Bearer, National Leader, Local Icon' it assessed Chamberlain's work as Mayor of Birmingham, Colonial Secretary, leader of the Liberal Unionist Party and Tariff Reform.
(48.) Porter himself denies being a liberal unionist, like Aughey or McCartney, and puts forward a rival concept of civic unionism to distinguish himself from other unionist commentators.
In addition to his use of the papers of Liberal (including Liberal Unionist), Nationalist, and Radical Parliamentarians, Biagini's work also relies on party records, local history collections of municipal libraries, and county archives.
He served in various offices and when the home rule for Ireland split occurred he became the most active member of the Liberal Unionist party.
Although often perceived as a Liberal, Fawcett's opposition to Home Rule for Ireland led her to leave that party and become a Liberal Unionist in the 1880s.
Ritchie's "Benthamism grown tame and sleek." He observes that Sidgwick as essayist and correspondent was more adventurous, but does not follow this up by using Sidgwick's very radical essay, "the Theory of Classical Education" of 1868, demanding an end to the dominance of classics, his address on authority to the Cambridge Reform Club in 1872, or the fascinating exchange of correspondence with Sir Lewis Mallet in 1887, which ended up with Cobden's acolyte accusing the active Liberal Unionist of near communism.
It was won by the Conservatives, led by Lord Salisbury, who then formed an alliance with the Liberal Unionist Party and had a large majority over the Liberals, led by Lord Rosebery.