licensed practical nurse

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li·censed practical nurse

(lī′sənst)
n. Abbr. LPN
A nurse who has completed a practical nursing program and is licensed by a state to provide routine patient care under the direction of a registered nurse or a physician.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

li′censed prac′tical nurse′


n.
a person who has completed a program in nursing and is licensed to provide basic care under the supervision of a physician or registered nurse. Abbr.: LPN
[1950–55]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.licensed practical nurse - a nurse who has enough training to be licensed by a state to provide routine care for the sick
nurse - one skilled in caring for young children or the sick (usually under the supervision of a physician)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Licensed practical nurses (LPNs) and licensed vocational nurses (LVNs) provide basic essential medical care under the supervision of RNs and have the lowest entry-level requirements.
There were about 2.9 million registered nurses nationwide, along with 702,400 licensed practical and licensed vocational nurses and 1.4 million nursing assistants as of May 2016, according to the United States Department of Labors Bureau of Labor Statistics.
The newly enhanced compact, or eNLC, is the licensure model of the future that allows registered nurses (RNs) and licensed vocational nurses (LVNs) to have one multistate license, with the privilege to practice in the home state and in other eNLC states physically, electronically, and/or telephonically.
Spetz said another reason behind the higher salaries for RNs is that California's licensed vocational nurses - who receive less training than registered nurses - are not allowed to do as much as their counterparts in other states.
The nurses included registered nurses, licensed practical nurses and licensed vocational nurses.
For example, 14% of all RNs in 2008 had previously been employed as licensed practical nurses or licensed vocational nurses (LPN/LVN) (Cook, Dover, Dickson, & Engh, 2010).
Licensed practical and licensed vocational nurses assist registered nurses in monitoring patients, dispensing basic treatment, and maintaining records.
This distinguished body includes Licensed Practical Nurses (LPN) or Licensed Vocational Nurses (LVN), Registered Nurses (RN), Nurse Anesthetists, Midwives and Nursing Assistants.
Researchers are now working to recruit female registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, licensed vocational nurses and nursing students ages 20 to 46 who live in the U.S.
Among licensed practical and licensed vocational nurses, the percentage of men grew from 3.9 percent in 1970 to 8.1 percent in 2011.
Among the jobs expected to experience shortages are medical assistants, home health care aides, licensed nursing assistants, emergency medical technicians, dietitians, licensed vocational nurses, registered nurses, dental assistants and hygienists, physical and occupational therapists, medical coders, radiographers, respiratory therapists, medical interpreters and health information technicians.