lichee

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Related to Lichas: Alcides

li·chee

 (lē′chē)
n.
Variant of litchi.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lichee

(ˌlaɪˈtʃiː)
n
(Plants) a variant spelling of litchi
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

li•tchi

li•chee

(ˈli tʃi)

n., pl. -tchis or -chees.
1. the fruit of a Chinese tree, Litchi chinensis, of the soapberry family, consisting of a thin, brittle shell enclosing a sweet, jellylike pulp and a single seed.
2. the tree itself.
[1580–90; < New Latin < Chinese lìzhi ( scallion + zhī branch)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lichee - Chinese tree cultivated especially in Philippines and India for its edible fruitlichee - Chinese tree cultivated especially in Philippines and India for its edible fruit; sometimes placed in genus Nephelium
leechee, lichi, litchee, litchi nut, lychee, litchi, lichee - Chinese fruit having a thin brittle shell enclosing a sweet jellylike pulp and a single seed; often dried
fruit tree - tree bearing edible fruit
genus Litchi - Chinese trees
2.lichee - Chinese fruit having a thin brittle shell enclosing a sweet jellylike pulp and a single seedlichee - Chinese fruit having a thin brittle shell enclosing a sweet jellylike pulp and a single seed; often dried
edible fruit - edible reproductive body of a seed plant especially one having sweet flesh
lichee, litchi, Litchi chinensis, litchi tree, Nephelium litchi - Chinese tree cultivated especially in Philippines and India for its edible fruit; sometimes placed in genus Nephelium
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
ليتشي: نَوْع فاكِهه
litkatré; litkaplóma

lychee,

lichee

(ˈlaitʃiː) , (ˈliː-) noun
(a Chinese tree bearing) a small round fruit with white juicy pulp.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
As when ALCIDES from OEALIA Crown'd With conquest, felt th' envenom'd robe, and tore Through pain up by the roots THESSALIAN Pines, And LICHAS from the top of OETA threw Into th' EUBOIC Sea.
The transformations into stone, whether in part or whole, are of: Aglauros, Echo, Theban ladies, King Atlas, Cinyras, Niobe, Lichas, Olenos and Lethaea, prophets, a snake, a wolf, Phantasos, a serpent, a judge, Scylla, Alcinous' ships, men's bowels and lynx urine (Rouse, Shakespeare's Ovid, 61, 62, 95, 98, 121, 126, 187, 202, 206, 220, 228, 233, 238, 268, 276, 287, 301, 304); only Aglauros, once transformed into stone, is likened to an image.
83,6 und 117,3), erotische Abenteuer mit Lichas und Tryphaena (Sat.
The young counter-tenor Rupert Enticknap (Lichas) is a great prospect, sweet-toned and mellifluous.
Lichas (1795-1815) or Theseus Fighting the Centaur (1804-1819), both of
Along with baritone Sumner Thompson s Hercules, the cast also included tenor Colin Baker as his son, Hyllus, soprano Nathalie Paulin as the captive Princess Iole, niezzzo Laura Pudwell (replacing an indisposed Mireille Lebel) as the herald Lichas and baritone David Roth as Priest of Jupiter.
780, [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] is used to describe Lichas' being fatally flung against a rock by Herakles.
In the storm scene in Petronius's Satyricon (114-15), Encolpius, Ascylton, Giton and Eumolpus find themselves aboard a ship owned by Lichas of Tarentum and his wife, Tryphaena.
At one point, Lichas, the attendant of Heracles, the unexpected guest who has unwittingly caused so much trouble in this house of mourning, enacts the labours of his master, one of which involves a monstrous bull, here symbolic of masculine power and sexual potency:
Let me lodge Lichas on the horns o' the moon, And with these hands that grasp'd the heaviest club, Subdue my worthiest self....