singer-songwriter

(redirected from Liedermacher)
Related to Liedermacher: songwriter

singer-songwriter

n
(Music, other) a performer who writes his or her own songs
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

singer-songwriter

[ˌsɪŋəʳˈsɒŋraɪtəʳ] Ncantautor(a) m/f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

singer-songwriter

nLiedermacher(in) m(f)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Mani Matter und die Liedermacher: zum Begriff des `Liedermachers' und zu Matters Kunst des Autoren-Liedes.
While these nine essays combine a variety of perspectives, the central narrative remains focused on the Liedermacher ('song makers'), as political singers like Wolf Biermann, Franz Josef Degenhardt, Dieter Suverkrup, and Konstantin Wecker have been called.
Robb's first chapters thus illuminate in rich detail how Liedermacher in East and West Germany adapted this historical material and developed a completely new stylistic genre.
The Liedermacher were completely marginalized during the final 1969 festival, which rather focused on underground groups like Tangerine Dream (who, however, lacked the connection to folk music apparent with British bands like Fairport Convention).
In the course of his study, David Robb (himself a Germanist and Liedermacher) offers a unique insight into previously unpublished scripts, and uses photographs, Stasi files, detailed stage-books, and interviews to get closer to the phenomenon that was 'Mensching & Wenzel--fast eine Markename'.
They are, then, so much more than the poetics of perhaps the most accomplished "Liedermacher" and balladeer of this century.
The section on the 'Liedermacher', while highly informative, is only tangential to the rest of the text and leaves one wondering why this often ephemeral minor genre deserves so much attention.
From this study one would be tempted to assume that 'post-War German literature' was largely synonymous with the German novel, that there had been little drama of note since the Third Reich, that 'Liedermacher' had been more important than poets, and that the journalism of literati was as reliable a barometer as literature itself.
Can the "Liedermacher" go beyond mere catchiness, beyond the polemically effective?