lied

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lied

 (lēt)
n. pl. lie·der (lē′dər)
A German art song for solo voice and piano.

[German Lied, from Middle High German liet, from Old High German liod.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

lied

(liːd; German liːt)
n, pl lieder (ˈliːdə; German ˈliːdər)
(Classical Music) music any of various musical settings for solo voice and piano of a romantic or lyrical poem, for which composers such as Schubert, Schumann, and Wolf are famous
[from German: song]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

lied1

(laɪd)

v.
pt. and pp. of lie 1.

lied2

(lid, lit)

n., pl. lied•er (ˈli dər)
a typically 19th-century German art song: Schubert lieder.
[1850–55; < German: song]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.lied - a German art song of the 19th century for voice and piano
song, vocal - a short musical composition with words; "a successful musical must have at least three good songs"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

lied

[liːd] (lieder (pl)) [ˈliːdəʳ] Nlied m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in classic literature ?
That he could play pieces, and difficult pieces, I knew well, because at my request he has played me some of Mendelssohn's Lieder, and other favourites.
(Max Friedlaender gives the first three stanzas of Spee's poem in his book Brahms Lieder.(6))
In his Brahms' Lieder (1922) Max Friedlaender adopted Kalbeck's view of the origins of In stiller Nacht (though not his interpretation of it as a secular song).