Liegnitz


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Liegnitz

(ˈliːɡnɪts)
n
(Placename) the German name for Legnica
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Born in 1928 in the former town of Liegnitz in then-German Silesia -- today Legnica in southwest Poland -- Moses moved to Munich in the 1950s where he began his career creating photo series for Stern magazine.
AFTER the Battle of Liegnitz, fought between the Mongol Empire and a combined European force in Poland in 1241, the Mongols cut off the right ear of each fallen European to count the dead, amounting to a grisly nine sacks of severed ears.
53 Similarly, he proposed a solution for the controversy over free will that had broken out between Luther and Erasmus in 1524 and 1525 by publishing two treatises on that matter in 1527--Von der Freiheit des Miens (On the Freedom of the Will), with a preface for Georg von Brandenburg, and Das ander Biichlein von der Freiwilligkeit des Menschen (The Second Book on the Free Will of Humans), with a preface for Friedrich II von Liegnitz.
A good example can be found in an essay written by Gerhard Kluge on the history of the pilgrimage site of Wahlstatt near Liegnitz (Lignica) in Lower Silesia.
Another case where an explanation is absent where one might be expected is in regard to the decision of the expeditionary force that defeated the Polish forces and Teutonic knights at Liegnitz in April 1241 to forgo further conquests in the region, contenting itself with plundering on the way to rejoin the main Mongol army at Mohi.
Taught at Zlotoryja (Goldberg) 1523-25, Liegnitz 1525-29, and Zlotoryja again from 1531 until death.
But Liegnitz would eventually cede pride of place to the neighboring metropolis of Breslau as Lower and Middle Silesia (Regierungsbezirk Breslau) merged into one larger province, still called Lower Silesia, after the First World War.
In some places, of course, the NSDAP mobilised Catholic voters on a significant scale, as happened in Breslau and Liegnitz (towns in Silesia where conflicts between Germans and Poles coloured political identity), in the Catholic rural areas of the Palatinate, and among some Catholics in the Black Forest; but these cases were atypical.
Logau spent his life in service to the petty courts of Brieg and Liegnitz.